Human rights are rights held by individuals simply because they are part of the human species. They are the rights shared equally by everyone regardless of sex, race, nationality, and economic background. They are universal in content.

(Ishay, M., 2004)

From the document: Human Rights Awareness Bibliography http://www.wpbpl.com/kids/PDF/human_rights.pdf

Suggested reading to support The UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights

http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml and http://www.youthforhumanrights.org/what-are-human-rights/universal-declaration-of-human-rights/articles-1-15.html (with video)

Note that each of these titles can fit in many categories. I have simply placed each title in 1 category to avoid duplication. Clicking on book images will take you to the library catalogue record if you are using a home computer. Links below the cover picture are for use within Seven Oaks School Division. If the pictures appear small, click on a cover then click the back button as this will reload the pictures with the correct sizing.

Article One = Right to Equality.

We are all born free.
We all have our own thoughts and ideas. We should all be treated in the same way.

 Hannah resents the traditions of her Jewish heritage until time travel places her in the middle of a small Jewish village in Nazi-occupied Poland.

1 The Devil’s Arithmetic / Jane Yolen

 She was a young German Jew. He was an ardent member of the Hitler Youth. This is the true story of their parallel journey through World War II.

Parallel Journeys / Eleanor Ayer


 With the help of his good friend and her three-legged dog, Leftovers, ten-year-old Keath learns how to handle the class bully and deal with being the only white boy in his class.

Nothing Wrong with a Three-Legged Dog / Graham McNamee

Discussion guide: http://www.adl.org/education/curriculum_connections/winter_2005/Three_Legged_Dog.asp?cc_section=3_legged

 Thirteen-year-old Xio, a Mexican American girl, and Frederick, who has just moved to California from Wisconsin, quickly become close friends, but when Xio starts thinking of Frederick as her boyfriend, he must confront his feelings of confusion and face the fear that he might be gay.
 4 So Hard to Say / Alex Sanchez

Article Two = Freedom from Discrimination.

These rights belong to everybody, whatever our differences.

 In Uganda in 1972, fifteen-year-old Sabine and her family, wealthy citizens of Indian descent, try to preserve their normal life during the ninety days allowed by President Idi Amin for all foreign Indians to leave the country, while soldiers and others terrorize them and people disappear.

Child of Dandelions / Shenaaz Nanji

 The ordinary interactions and everyday routines of the Watsons, an African American family living in Flint, Michigan, are drastically changed after they go to visit Grandma in Alabama in the summer of 1963.

6 The Watsons Go To Birmingham — 1963 / Christopher Paul Curtis

 From her home in Lidice, Czechoslovakia, in 1942, eleven-year-old Milada is taken with other blond, blue-eyed children to a school in Poland to be trained as “proper Germans” for adoption by German families, but all the while she remembers her true name and history.

7 Someone Named Eva / Joan M. Wolf

 As a school assignment, a thirteen-year-old boy writes an alphabiography–life from A to Z–and explores issues of friendship, family, school, and the challenges of being a gay teenager.

8 Totally Joe / James Howe

 Vince lives in a town that is divided, Indians on one side, whites on the other. Trying to balance his communit prejudices with his shifting alliances, Vince is forced to take a stand.

9 Yellow Line / Sylvia Olsen

 A series of poems express the views of various people in a small Vermont town, including a young black girl and a young Jewish girl, during the early 1920s when the Ku Klux Klan is trying to infiltrate the town.

10 Witness / Karen Hesse

 Garnet Havelock knows what it’s like to be on the outside, not one of the crowd. Then a mysterious girl transfers to his school and Garnet thinks he might have found the woman of his dreams– if only he could get her to talk to him. At the same time, he becomes caught up in a mystery centered in his community. As he and Raphaella draw closer to the truth, they uncover a horrifying chapter in his town’s history, and learn how deep-seated prejudices and persecution from the past can still reverberate in the present.

11 Stones / William Bell

 When rumors that Janice’s favorite teacher is gay begin to circulate at school and in the community, she decides to stand up for him even in the face of her mother’s opposition.

12 No Big Deal / Ellen Jaffe McClain

Article Three = Right to Life, Liberty, Personal Security.

We all have the right to life, and to live in freedom and safety.

 Adeline grows up in China, unwanted and unloved because her family consideres her back luck when her mother dies after her birth.

13 Chinese Cinderella : the True Story of an Unwanted Daughter / Adeline Yen Mah

 Jacob and Oteka find themselves in the Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda and must try to survive.

14 War Brothers / Sharon McKay

 Based on the true story of an indomitable young girl living in war-torn Mozambique. A young African girl, Sofia, copes in the aftermath of a landmine explosion that takes both her legs and the life of her sister.

15 Secrets in the Fire / Henning Mankell
Lesson Plan: http://www.amnesty.org.uk/uploads/documents/doc_22654.pdf

 Jewish teenagers David, Yitzhak, Moshe, Eva, and Anne all kept diaries and were all killed in Hitler’s death camps. These are their stories, in their own words. Author Jacob Boas is a Holocaust survivor who was born in the same camp to which Anne Frank was sent.

16 We are Witnesses : Five Diaries of Teenagers Who Died in the Holocaust

 Hospitalized with the dreaded atom bomb disease, leukemia, a child in Hiroshima races against time to fold one thousand paper cranes to verify the legend that by doing so a sick person will become healthy.

17 Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes / Eleanor Coerr

 Presents an English translation of the diary entries of nineteen-year-old Thura Al-Windawi, the oldest daughter in a middle-class Shia Muslim family living in Baghdad, in which she shares her thoughts, emotions, and experiences throughout the war in Iraq, from March 15 through June 2003.

18 Thura’s Diary: My Life in Wartime Iraq / Thura al-Windawi

Three wishes : Palestinian and Israeli children speak Deborah Ellis presents stories of the children of Israel and Palestine based on interviews done in the winter of 2002 while in Israel and Palestine

19 Three wishes : Palestinian and Israeli children speak / Deborah Ellis

 The heartbreaking true story of Mariatu, who at twelve years of age is brutally attack and torture by heavily armed rebel soldiers in a small rural village in Sierra Leone that left her with both hands cut off, its aftermath and her eventual arrival in Toronto where she began to pull together the pieces of her broken life. Now, 21 years old Mariatu will embark on a North American speaking tour as a UNICEF Special Representative for Children in Armed Conflicts.

20 Bite of the Mango / Mariatu Kamara

Safe house Northern Ireland. In 1999, one year after the Good Friday peace accord, sectarian violence still runs rampant in Belfast and the hatred between
Protestant and Catholic runs deep. Liam’s father is a peacemaker to the Catholic
community. When his parents are brutally murdered, he is forced to run for his
life. Taken to a police safe house, Liam is betrayed and forced to run again,
from the very people who are supposed to be protecting him.

21 Safe house / James Heneghan

 After the horrific events of Pearl Harbor, a young Japanese girl and her family are taken to an internment camp where she mets a young Mohave boy who might just become her real friend.

22 Weedflower / Cynthia Kadohata

 A Japanese-Canadian girl recounts the experiences of the three years she and her family spent in a Canadian internment camp during World War II.

23 A child in prison camp / Takashima

Article Four = Freedom from Slavery.

Nobody has any right to make us a slave. We cannot make anyone our slave.

 Uncovers the shadowy world of human trafficking, debt bondage, forced labor and other types of modern slavery presently all over the world.

24 Slavery Today / Kevin Bales & Becky Cornell

 When a note placed in a delivered lunch tin (a tiffin) is lost Kunal is seperated from his mother and ends up living as a slave. While learning to deliver tiffins with the help of an old friend Kunal hatches a plant that could reunite him with his mother and a better life.

25 The Tiffin / Mahtab Narsimhan

 Kidnapped by the crew of an Africa-bound ship, a thirteen-year-old boy discovers to his horror that he is on a slaver and his job is to play music for the exercise periods of the human cargo.

26 The Slave Dancer / Paula Fox

Article Five = Freedom from Torture and Degrading Treatment.

Nobody has any right to hurt us or to torture us.

 A young slave tries to hide the horrors of slavery from his younger cousin, a light-skinned slave who is the daughter of the plantation owner.

27 Send One Angel Down / Virginia Frances Schwartz

 After World War II, Nadia comes to live in Canada but troubling memories and dreams of her past begin to haunt her.

28 Stolen Child / Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch

 1950. Après avoir passé cinq ans dans un camp de réfugiés, Nadia, douze ans, immigre à Brantford, en Ontario. En compagnie de Marusia et d’Ivan, un couple d’Ukrainiens qui la traite comme sa propre fille, elle se familiarise peu à peu avec sa nouvelle vie, suivant des cours d’anglais, allant à l’école, découvrant des fêtes (dont Halloween) et savourant le bonheur d’être enfin en sécurité. Nadia s’interroge néanmoins sur sa véritable famille, dont elle ne se rappelle rien. Après tant d’années à mentir pour sauver sa peau, elle a en effet étrangement occulté son propre passé. Or, les souvenirs refoulés lui reviennent désormais sous forme de courts flashbacks et de cauchemars terrifiants qu’elle tente d’assembler à la manière d’un puzzle. Avec horreur, elle se rappelle un jour avoir vu le Fürher. Et voilà que des compagnons d’école lui font remarquer qu’elle ressemble à une nazie. Et s’ils avaient raison? Comment pourrait-elle alors jamais se faire accepter et s’accepter elle-même? Dans le cas contraire, qui est-elle?.

29 Enfant Volée / Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch

 About the relationship between a young Scottish settler and a Beothuk boy of Newfoundland in the early 19th century. Their friendship develops despite the intense hostility between the peoples. In the shocking climax, the author plausibly recounts the annihilation of the Beothuks.

30 Copper Sunrsie / Bryan Buchan

Article Six = Right to Recognition as a Person before the Law.

You Have Rights No Matter Where You Go. I am a person just like you!

31 Mable Riley : a reliable record of humdrum, peril and romance / Marthe Jocelyn

Article Seven = Right to Equality before the Law.

The law is the same for everyone. It must treat us all fairly.

 Provides first-hand accounts by former slaves on life before and after the Civil War.

32 Slave Narratives : the journey to freedom / Elaine Landau

 Young Marta’s life in Budapest has been shattered by war. Her school closes, her father is sent to dig ditches, she has little food, warm clothing and personal freedom. Many of the elderly , women and children were sent to the ghetto and then on to concentration camps. But Marta’s family is lucky, they might be saved by the efforts of Raoul Wallenberg who may have saved the lives of 100,000 people through his efforts.

33 My Canary Yellow Star / Eva Wiseman

Article Eight = Your Human Rights Are Protected by Law.

We can all ask for the law to help us when we are not treated fairly.

 Smuggled out of Nigeria after their mother’s murder, Sade and her younger brother are abandoned in London when their uncle fails to meet them at the airport and they are fearful of their new surroundings and of what may have happened to their journalist father back in Nigeria.

34 The Other Side of Truth / Beverley Naidoo

Article Nine = Freedom from Arbitrary Arrest and Exile.

No Unfair Detainment. Nobody has the right to put us in prison without good reason and keep us there, or to send us away from our country.

 Anneke, a Dutch Jewish teenager, is sent with her family to Theresienstadt, a “model” concentration camp, where she confronts great evil and learns to do what it takes to survive.

35 What World is left / Monique Polak

 A chronicle of the holocaust through the eyes of a 14 year old Hungarian jew who survived Birkenau, Auschwitz, Buna and Buchenwald.

36 Night / Elie Wiesel

 Bored and lonely after his family moves from Berlin to a place called “Out-With” in 1942, Bruno, the son of a Nazi officer, befriends a boy in striped pajamas who lives behind a wire fence.

37 The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas / John Boyne

 Nine-year-old Michiko bids her father goodbye before her birthday celebration. She doesn’t know the government has ordered all Japanese-born men out of the city. Ten days later, her family joins hundreds of Japanese-Canadians on a train to the interior of British Columbia. Now she must face local prejudice, the worst winter in forty years and her first Christmas without her father.

38 When the Cherry Blossoms Fell / Jennifer Maruno

The diary of Laura's twin Three weeks before her Bat Mitzvah, Laura is assigned the task of reading the diary of Sara Gittler, a young girl her own age who was imprisoned by the Nazis in the Warsaw Ghetto during the Holocaust. Laura draws on Sara’s strength and courage to confront a friend who may be involved in the desecration of a Jewish cemetery.

39 The diary of Laura’s twin / Kathy Kacer

Article Ten = Right to Trial.

If we are put on trial this should be in public. The people who try us should not let anyone tell them what to do.

 In Mississippi in 1955, a sixteen-year-old finds himself at odds with his grandfather over issues surrounding the kidnapping and murder of a fourteen-year-old African American from Chicago.

40 Mississippi Trial, 1955 / Chris Crowe

Article Eleven = Right to Be Considered Innocent Until Proven Guilty.

Nobody should be blamed for doing something until it is proven. When people say we did a bad thing we have the right to show it is not true.

 After his parents are wrongly accused of selling drugs, Diego finds himself living in a women’s prison with his mother where he runs errands to earn a little money to help his family.

41 I Am a Taxi / Deborah Ellis

 When a Muslim boy is arrested at a high school on suspicion of terrorist affiliations, growing racial tensions divide the student population.

42 Bifocal / Deborah Ellis & Eric Walters

 In 1687 in Connecticut, Kit Tyler, feeling out of place in the Puritan household of her aunt, befriends an old woman considered a witch by the community and suddenly finds herself standing trial for witchcraft.

43 The Witch of Blackbird Pond / Elizabeth George Speare

Article Twelve = Freedom from Interference with Privacy, Family, Home, and Correspondence.

Nobody should try to harm our good name. Nobody has the right to come into our home, open our letters, or bother us or our family without a good reason.

 When German soldiers arrive in Zloczow during World War II, a young Jewish girl must decide whether or not to conceal her identity and work for a Nazi in Germany in order to survive.

44 In My Enemy’s House / Carol Matas

 Told with simplicity and grace, this powerful true story recalls one of the most terrifying times in Chinese history.

45 Red Scarf Girl / Ji-Li Jiang

 Seventeen-year-old Josh, a loner-philosopher who wants to make a difference in the world, tries to maintain his secret identity as the author of a web site that is receiving national attention.

46 The Gospel According to Larry / Janet Tashjian

The secret of Gabi's dresser Three children ask their grandma lots of questions about a treasured cabinet she keeps in her living room.  Grandma tells the strory of how as a young Jewish girl she lived on a family farm in Eastern Europe during the Second World War. Grandma talks about her community before the Nazi occupation and what happened afterwards.  When the Nazis searched houses for Jewish children, her mother hid her in her dining-room dresser.  When the war ended, it was the only object retrieved from the family home.

Article Thirteen = Freedom to Move.

We all have the right to go where we want in our own country and to travel as we wish.

 John Bul Dau and his wife, Martha, describe the hardships they experienced, including violence, famine, and war, while growing up in the Sudan and explain how they escaped the region to start a new life.

48 Lost Boy, Lost Girl : Escaping Civil War in Sudan / John Bul Dau and Martha Arual Akech

 As the United Nations prepares to vote on whether the Arabs and Jews should be separated in 1947, Ruth Mendolsohn, a Haganah member, finds her family life paralleling the outside world as her brother, an Irgun member, also prepares to fight.

49 The Garden / Carol Matas

The night spies

After hiding from the Nazis in the back of a barn in a small village for months, cousins Max and Gabi decide to take a nighttime walk and discover something incredible that can help put an end to the mad reign of the Nazi regime.
50 The night spies / by Kathy Kacer
My name is number 4 : a true story Here is the true story of fourteen-year-old Ting-xingʹs tumultuous life turned upside down by Chinaʹs Cultural Revolution. After the death of both her parents, Ting-xing and her four siblings endure the brutality of Red Guard attacks on their schools and even their house as they struggle against poverty and hunger. At sixteen, Ting-xing herself is exiled to a prison farm far from home.
51 My name is number 4 : a true story / Ting-xing Ye

Article Fourteen = Right to Seek a Safe Place to Live.

If we are frightened of being badly treated in our own country, we all have the right to run away to another country to be safe.

 Provides interviews with twenty-three young Iraqi children who have moved away from their homeland and tells of their fears, challenges, and struggles to rebuild their lives in foreign lands as refugees of war.

52 Children of War / Deborah Ellis

 Teenage best friends Tamanna and Yasmine face arranged marriages and persecution by the Taliban in their Afghan village, so they flee through dangerous mountain passes with only one another to rely upon.

53 Thunder Over Kandahar / Sharon McKay

 In 1861, thirteen-year-old Phoebe runs away from her master’s Alabama plantation and joins four other slaves as they journey to Canada on the Underground Railroad.

54 If I Just Had Two Wings / Virginia Frances Schwartz

 A fictionalized version of the life of Harriet Jacobs, told in the form of letters that she might have written during her slavery in North Carolina and as she prepared for escape to the North in 1842.

55 Letters From a Slave Girl : the Story of Harriet Jacobs / Mary E. Lyons

 In an attempt to save his daughter’s life, Eva’s father sends her from Poland to a labor camp in Czechoslovakia where she and her sister survive the war.

56 Torn Thread / Anne Isaacs

Article Fifteen = Right to a Nationality.

We all have the right to belong to a country.

 Labeled outcasts by their Ethiopian neighbors because of their Jewish faith, Wudita and her family make the arduous trek on foot to Sudan in the hope of the promise of a better life. Instead, they are herded into a squalid refugee camp. Wudita becomes separated from her family and forced back to the Ethiopian border.

57 Cry of the Giraffe : based on a true story / Judie Oron

 Relates how Benjamin Banneker’s grandmother journeyed from England to Maryland in the late seventeenth century, worked as an indentured servant, began a farm of her own, and married a freed slave.

58 Molly Bannaky / written by Alice McGill ; pictures by Chris K. Soentpiet

 In this wordless graphic novel, a man leaves his homeland and sets off for a new country, where he must build a new life for himself and his family.

59 The Arrival / Shaun Tan

Article Sixteen = Right to Marriage and Family.

Every grown-up has the right to marry and have a family if they want to. Men and women have the same rights when they are married, and when they are separated.

 On the brink of adulthood, Nana and her twin brother face a certain future.  Daughter of a proud Kwakiutl Chief she will be sold in marriage to another tribe while her twin brother Nanolatch stays behing to become a warrior chief.

60 Initiation / by Virginia Frances Schwartz

Article Seventeen = Right to Your Own Things.

Everyone has the right to own things or share them. Nobody should take our things from us without a good reason.

 Twelve year old Diego escapes from slavery at an illegal cocaine operation and is taken in by the Ricardos, coca farmers.

61 Sacred Leaf / Deborah Ellis

 In 1859, eleven-year-old Elijah Freeman, the first free-born child in Buxton, Canada, which is a haven for slaves fleeing the American south, uses his wits and skills to try to bring to justice the lying preacher who has stolen money that was to be used to buy a family’s freedom.

62 Elijah of Buxton / Christopher Paul Curtis

 In 1787 a fourteen-year-old slave, anxious to buy freedom for himself and his mother, escapes from his dishonest master and tries to find help in cashing the solidier’s notes received by his father for fighting in the Revolution.

63 Jump Ship to Freedom / James Lincoln Collier, Christopher Collier

 Follows a family’s two hundred forty-one year history, from the capture of an African boy in the 1750s through the lives of his descendants, as their dreams and circumstances lead them away from and back to the small plot of land in South Carolina that they call the Glory Field.

64 The Glory Field / Walter Dean Myers

Article Eighteen = Freedom of Thought.

We all have the right to believe in what we want to believe, to have a religion, or to change it if we want.

 In his last year in residential school, Lawrence learns the power of friendship and finds the courage to stand up for his beliefs. He returns home to find the traditional First Nations life he loved is over. He feels like a stranger to his family until his grandfather’s gentle guidance helps him find his way.

65 Goodbye Buffalo Bay / Larry Loyie

 Looks at the experiences of a young Inuit girl returning from a residential religious school, where she is not recognized by her mother and is seen as an outsider.

66 A Stranger at Home : a True Story / Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Pokiak-Fenton ; artwork by Liz Amini-Holmes

Article Nineteen = Freedom of Expression.

We all have the right to make up our own minds, to think what we like, to say what we think, and to share our ideas with other people.

 Although Zana, an eleven-year-old Albanian girl, experiences the turmoil and violence of the 1999 conflict in her native Kosovo, she remembers her father’s admonition to not let her heart become filled with hate.

67 Girl of Kosovo / Alice Mead

 While trying to help her financially destitute family, twelve-year-old Leyla ends up on a slave ship bound for Istanbul, then in the beautiful Topkapi Palace, where she discovers that life in the sheltered world of the palace harem follows its own rigid rules and rhythms and offers her unexpected opportunities during Turkey’s brief Tulip Period of the 1720’s.

68 Leyla : the Black Tulip / Alev Lytle Croutier.

Article Twenty = Right to Public Assembly.

We all have the right to meet our friends and to work together in peace to defend our rights. Nobody can make us join a group if we don’t want to.

 Following the deaths of two classmates in a bomb explosion at his Alabama church, fourteen-year-old Stone organizes a children’s march for civil rights in the autumn of 1963.

69 Just like Martin / Ossie Davis

Article Twenty-one = Right to Participate in Government and in Free Elections.

We all have the right to take part in the government of our country. Every grown-up should be allowed to choose their own leaders.

 Her father’s involvement with the Kurdish resistance movement in Iraq forces thirteen-year-old Tara to flee with her family over the border into Iran, where they face an unknown future.

70 Kiss the dust / Elizabeth Laird

 Four students who do not fit in at their small-town middle school decide to create a third party for the student council elections to represent all students who have ever been called names.

71 The Misfits / James Howe

 In 1939, twelve-year-old Neela meets a young freedom fighter at her sister’s wedding and soon after must rely on his help when her father fails to return home from a march in Calcutta against British occupation.

72 Neela : victory song / by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

Article Twenty-two = Right to Social Security.

We all have the right to affordable housing, medicine, education, and childcare, enough money to live on and medical help if we are ill or old.

 In Mississippi in the early 1900s ten-year-old David Logan’s family generously shares their well water with both white and black neighbors in an atmosphere of potential racial violence.

73 The Well / Mildred D. Taylor

Article Twenty-three = Workers’ Rights.

Every grown-up has the right to do a job, to a fair wage for their work, and to join a trade union.

 Chronicles the close friendship between two Japanese-American sisters growing up in rural Georgia during the late 1950s and early 1960s, and the despair when one sister becomes terminally ill.

74 Kira-Kira / Cynthia Kadohata

 Barbara Greenwood weaves the fictional story of Emily Watson together with factual accounts of the people and events surrounding the urban poor in North American cities in the early 1900s.

75 Factory Girl / Barbara Greenwood

Article Twenty-four = Right to Play.

We all have the right to rest from work and to relax.

 A fictional account of five children- Thomas, Wilson,Joey, Monica, and Nelson who are sent to aboriginal boarding school. The stories are based on the recollections of a number of Tsartlip First Nations people. The five children are taken from Tsartlip Day School to live at Kuper Island Residential School where they suffer the pain of homesickness and confusion over their new regimented life, away from family, traditions and language.

76 No Time to Say Goodbye : Children’s Stories of Kuper Island Residential School / Sylvia Olsen with Rita Morris and Ann Sam

 A biography of a Czech girl who died in the Holocaust, told in alternating chapters with an account of how the curator of a Japanese Holocaust center learned about her life after Hana’s suitcase was sent to her.

77 Hana’s Suitcase / Karen Levine

 Living in Gaza City in the late 1980’s, eleven-year-old Malaak and her family are touched by the increasing violence between Israelis and Palestinians when first her father disappears and then her older brother is drawn to the Islamic Jihad.

78 A Stone in My Hand / Cathryn Clinton

Discusses the reasons behind child labor practices, especially in India, and the international efforts to end child labor throughout the world, and describes the life of a thirteen-year-old Indian boy who works to support his family.

79 Living as a child laborer : Mehboob’s story / Catherine Chambers

Article Twenty-five = Right to Have Food and Shelter for All.

We all have the right to a good life. Mothers and children, people who are old, unemployed or disabled, and all people have the right to be cared for.

 Valli has always been afraid of the lepers living on the other side of the train tracks in the coal town of Jharia, India, so when a chance encounter with a doctor reveals she also has leprosy, Valli rejects help and begins an uncertain life on the streets.

80 No Ordinary Day / Deborah Ellis

 Because the Taliban rulers of Kabul, Afghanistan, impose strict limitations on women’s freedom and behavior, eleven-year-old Parvana must disguise herself as a boy so that her family can survive after her father’s arrest.

81 The Breadwinner / Deborah Ellis

Article Twenty-six = Right to Education.

Education is a right. Primary school should be free. We should learn about the United Nations and how to get on with others. Our parents can choose what we learn.

 Traces how the author, having been rescued and resuscitated by Himalayan villagers after a failed attempt to climb K2, worked to build schools that would benefit the young girls who were forbidden an education by Taliban restrictions.

82 Three Cups of Tea / Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin

 Chronicles the unbreakable spirit of an Inuit girl bullied by a teacher while attending an Arctic residential school.

83 Fatty Legs : a true story / Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton ; artwork by Liz Amini-Holmes

 Twelve-year-old Sarny’s brutal life as a slave becomes even more dangerous when a newly arrived slave offers to teach her how to read.

84 Nightjohn / Gary Paulsen

 Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.

85 The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian / Sherman Alexie

 A black girl struggles to fulfill her father’s dreams and to help make a place for her family in a white town in the Southwest at the turn of the century.

86 Words By Heart / Ouida Sebestyen

The diary of Ma Yan : the struggles and hopes of a Chinese schoolgirl Thrust into the hands of a foreign journalist by her illiterate mother, Ma Yan’s diary describes her struggles to attend school in a drought-stricken corner of rural China–a place where education is the only hope for overcoming a life of crushing poverty.

87 The Diary of Ma Yan : the struggles and hopes of a Chinese schoolgirl / edited and introduced by Pierre Haski

Article Twenty-seven = Right to Participate in the Cultural Life of Community.

Copyright is a special law that protects one’s own artistic creations and writings; others cannot make copies without permission. We all have the right to our own way of life and to enjoy the good things that art, science and learning bring.

Article Twenty-eight = Right to a Fair and Free World.

There must be proper order so we can all enjoy rights and freedoms in our own country and all over the world.

 Portraits of five child victims of conflict, including regional history, maps and the causes and results of the conflict. Their stories are taken from five different places around the world– Uganda, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Bosnia and the Sudan.

88 When Elephants Fight : the Lives of Children in Conflict in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Sri Lanka, Sudan and Uganda / Eric Walters & Adrian Bradbury


Torn away : a novel 

Forcibly deported to Canada because of his terrorist activities in Northern Ireland, thirteen-year-old Declan must choose between his revolutionary past and a new life with his Canadian relatives.

89 Torn away / a novel by James Heneghan

Article Twenty-nine = Responsibility.

We have a duty to other people, and we should protect their rights and freedoms.

 Binti and her siblings are orphaned when their father dies of AIDS.  Split up and sent to relatives all over Malawi, they suffer increasing hardship until they are reunited through the influence of their formidable grandmother.

90 The Heaven Shop / Deborah Ellis

 Because of the strong influence which her grandfather, an abolitionist, has in her life, fourteen-year-old Lucy assists a fugitive slave girl in her escape.

91 True North / Kathryn Lasky

 At the request of his fellow slave Granny Judith, Christmas John risks his life to take runaways across a river from Kentucky to Ohio.  Based on slave narratives recorded in the 1930s.

92 Night Boat to Freedom / Margot Theis Raven ; pictures by E.B. Lewis

 Presents the true story about  the experiences of the author who, as a young Polish girl, hid and saved Jews during the Holocaust.

93 In My Hands : Memories of a Holocaust Rescuer / Irene Gut Opdyke with Jennifer Armstrong

Article Thirty = No One Can Take Away Your Human Rights.

 Fourteen Aboriginal women who attended residential schools, or whose lives were affected by the schools, reflect on their experiences, describing their years in residential schools across Canada and how they overcame tremendous obstacles to become strong and independent members of Aboriginal cultures.

94 Finding My Talk : How Fourteen Native Women Reclaimed Their Lives After Residential School / Agnes Grant

 A compilation, selected from various sources and arranged chronologically, of the reminiscences of slaves and ex-slaves about their experiences from the leaving of Africa through the Civil War and into the early twentieth century.
95
To Be a Slave / Julius Lester ; illustrated by Tom Feelings

 From the author of the international bestseller “Zlata’s Diary” comes a haunting testament to how war’s brutality affects the lives of young people, spanning from World War I to the war in Iraq that continues today.

96 Stolen Voices : Young People’s War Diaries, from World War I to Iraq


Lesson plans

http://takeaction.amnestyusa.org/atf/cf/%7B74ba1956-0c57-4b8e-9d15-d6ab8ce64cf1%7D/UDHRPosterSeriesAndTeachersGuidePt1.pdf

http://takeaction.amnestyusa.org/atf/cf/%7B74ba1956-0c57-4b8e-9d15-d6ab8ce64cf1%7D/UDHRPosterSeriesAndTeachersGuidePt2.pdf

http://www.freethechildren.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Childrens-Rights-Secondary-lesson-plan.pdf

Fact sheets and other information for teaching human rights

http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/briefing/children/children.pdf

http://visit.un.org/wcm/webdav/site/visitors/shared/documents/pdfs/Pub_United%20Nations_ABC_human%20rights.pdf

http://www.adl.org/education/curriculum_connections/winter_2005/Words_that_Heal1.asp?

Bibliographies of Human Rights books

http://www.adl.org/bibliography/default.asp

http://www.education.wisc.edu/ccbc/books/detailListBooks.asp?idBookLists=77

Body Image

Drug Abuse and Alcoholism

Homelessness

Violence and Abuse

Other topics to look for in your school library catalogue may include:

Foster home care

Adoption

Abortion

Rape

Family life

Sibling rivalry

… and many, many more!

Body Image


F Tok

More than you can chew / Marnelle Tokio.

Toronto : Tundra Books, c2003. 0887766390 (pbk.) 234 p.

Subjects: Eating disorders ; Anorexia nervosa – Fiction ; Body image – Fiction ; Self-acceptance — Fiction.

Marty Black, a high school senior, finds herself in a psychiatric institution where she is being treated for her eating disorder, and soon recognizes that her need for help is only the first tenuous step on a long road to recovery.

Click here to read part of this book online

F Orc

Big guy / Robin Stevenson.

Victoria, BC : Orca Book Publishers, c2008. 1551439107 (pbk.) 106 p.

Subjects: Gays – Fiction ; Love stories ; Self-acceptance – Fiction ; Body image – Fiction ; Honesty – Fiction ; Interpersonal relations – Fiction ; LGBTQ

Orca soundings.

Derek thinks he might be falling in love. The problem is, he hasn’t been entirely honest with his on-line boyfriend. Derek sent Ethan a photo taken before he got depressed and gained eighty pounds.

RL: 2.9.

Click here to read part of this book online


F Spa

Kim: empty inside : the diary of an anonymous teenager /edited by Beatrice Sparks, Ph.D.

New York : Avon Books, c2002. 0380814609 (pbk.) 165 p.

Subjects: Eating disorders ; Anorexia nervosa – Fiction ; Gymnastics – Fiction ; Weight loss – Fiction

Seventeen-year-old Kim, feeling the pressure of maintaining an A average to stay on her college gymnastics team, becomes obsessive about her weight and develops anorexia nervosa.

Click here to read part of this book online

F Sha

Thinandbeautiful.com / Liane Shaw.

Toronto : Second Story Press, c2009. 9781897187623 (pbk.) 263 p.

Subjects: Anorexia nervosa – Fiction ; Eating disorders – Fiction ; Canadian authors.

Seventeen-year-old Maddie has always flet a hole in her life, but she has finally found a way to fill it with her quest to mold her body into her ideal, thinnest shape.

Click here to read part of this book online.

F Fai

Tyranny / Lesley Fairfield.

Toronto : Tundra Books ; Plattsburgh, N.Y. : Tundra Books of Northern New York, c2009. 9780887769030 (pbk.) 114 p. : ill.

Subjects: Graphic novels ; Eating disorders – Fiction ; Anorexia nervosa – Fiction

In this graphic novel dealing with anorexia, young Anna–pressured by media, friends, the workplace, personal relationships, and fashion trends–descends into a seemingly unending cycle of misery. And whenever she tries to climb out of the abyss, her own personal demon, Tyranny, is there to push her back in. The contest seems uneven, and it might be except for one thing: Anna’s strength of character.

616.85 Got

Stick figure : a diary of my former self / Lori Gottlieb.

New York : Berkley Books, 2001. 0425178900 (pbk.) 240 p.

Subjects: Gottlieb, Lori – Health ; Anorexia nervosa — Patients – Biography ; Eating disorders.

Although it reads like a novel, funny, touching, and absolutely gripping true story Stick Figure is, astonishingly, the diary of Lori Gottlieb in 1978, when, at age 11 and all evidence to the contrary, she decided she was too fat and simply stopped eating.

F McN

Walking a thin line / Sylvia McNicoll ; cover art by Colin Poole.

Toronto, Ont. : Scholastic Canada, c1997. 0590123793 (pbk.) 220 p.

Subjects: Eating disorders – Fiction ; Obesity – Fiction ; Weight loss – Fiction ; Anorexia nervosa – Fiction ; Personal appearance – Fiction ; Canadian authors.

Andrea had always been a bit heavy, but now, wanting to be noticed by Jay, she is trying desperately to get thin.

F Har

Even if it kills me / Dorothy Joan Harris.

Toronto : Scholastic Canada, c1987. 059052366X (pbk.) 177 p.

Subjects: Anorexia nervosa – Fiction ; Eating disorders ; Canadian authors.

Melanie is a good girl, a model student. And she wants to be even better. Perfect, maybe. So she starts to diet. The trouble is, Melanie’s as good at dieting as she is at everything else. She’s determined to be thin…even if it kills her.

Back to Top


Drug Abuse and Alcoholism

F Fri

Lush / Natasha Friend.

New York : Scholastic Press, c2006. 9780439853477 (pbk.) 178, [6] p.

Subjects: Alcoholism – Fiction ; Fathers – Fiction ; Family life — Fiction.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [183-184]) and Internet addresses (p. [181-183]).

Unable to cope with her father’s alcoholism, thirteen-year-old Sam corresponds with an older student, sharing her family problems and asking for advice.

F Boy

Looking for a hero / David Boyd.

Oakville, Ont. : Rubicon, c1993. 0921156421 (pbk.) 102 p.

Subjects: Canadian authors ; Drug abuse – Fiction ; AIDS (Disease) — Fiction.

Nicholas Sparks is a “normal” fourteen-year-old who likes rock music and sports. The only problem is that something has caused him to commit a terrible act that has changed his life forever. His psychiatrist thinks she can help him, but she doesn’t know the dark secret that Nicholas is carrying. Told through a series of interviews, reports, and letters.

MYRCA nominee 1996. http://www.myrca.ca

F Wag

Sarah T. : portrait of a teenage alcoholic / by Robin S. Wagner.

New York : Ballantine Books, 1990, c1975. 0345342429 (pbk.) 120 p.

Subjects: Teenagers — Alcohol use – Fiction ; Alcoholism – Fiction ; Alcoholics — Fiction.

“Based on the Universal television production written by Richard and Esther Shapiro.”.

F Mye

The beast / Walter Dean Myers.

New York : Scholastic, 2003. 0439368421 (pbk.) 170 p.

Subjects: Interpersonal relations – Fiction ; School stories ; Drug abuse – Fiction ; African Americans – Fiction ; Harlem (New York, N.Y.) — Fiction.

A visit to his Harlem neighborhood and the discovery that the girl he loves is using drugs give sixteen-year-old Anthony Witherspoon a new perspective both on his home and on his life at a Connecticut prep school.

F Mac

The present tense of Prinny Murphy / Jill MacLean.

Brighton, MA : Fitzhenry & Whiteside, c2010. 9781554551453 (pbk.) 230 p.

Subjects: Bullies – Fiction ; Friendship – Fiction ;    Alcoholism – Fiction ; School stories ; Poetry – Fiction ; Books and reading – Fiction ; Reading disability – Fiction ; Canadian authors.

Sequel to The nine lives of Travis Keating.

Prinny Murphy is dealing with an alcoholic mother, losing a best friend, bullies, and a reading problem, but when a substitute teacher introduces her to a special book she realizes life is full of possibilities and poetry.

MYRCA nominee 2012.

http://www.myrca.ca/

Back to Top

Homelessness

F Bro

Being with Henry / Martha Brooks.

Toronto : Douglas & McIntyre, c1999. 0888993773 (pbk.) 173 p.

Subjects: Homeless teenagers – Fiction ;    Stepfathers – Fiction ; Elderly – Fiction ; Canadian authors — Manitoba.

Forced out of his home by a disagreeable and bullying stepfather, sixteen-year-old Laker moves to another town and strikes up an unexpected friendship with a frail but determined old man.

F Nel

The beggars’ ride / by Theresa Nelson.

New York : Orchard Books, c1992. 0531058964 (pbk.) 242 p.

Subjects: Homeless persons – Fiction ; Child sexual abuse – Fiction ; Atlantic City (N.J.) — Fiction.

Twelve-year-old Clare flees an unhappy home life and tries to survive on the streets of Atlantic City with a small gang of homeless kids, each of whom has his own secret reason for distrusting society.

F Wal

Shattered / Eric Walters ; with a foreword by Roméo Dallaire.

Toronto : Puffin Canada, 2007. 014331226X (pbk.) 210 p.

Subjects: Genocide — Rwanda – Fiction ; Peacekeeping forces ; Rwanda — History — 1994, Civil War — Fiction.

The terrors of the Rwandian genocide are explored in this poignant book as fifteen-year-old Ian meets a homeless man plagued by substance abuse and memories of his military career in Rwanda. During their friendship, Ian is presented with truths about the world, which he finds difficult to accept.

F Haw

Theories of relativity / Barbara Haworth-Attard.

New York : Henry Holt, c2003. 0006393004 (pbk.) 231 p.

Subjects: Homeless teenagers — Fiction ; Street life — Fiction.

Dylan is sixteen and homeless. He develops theories which help him cope with life on the streets but then his theories are challenged

F Bay

No fixed address / Maureen Bayless.

Toronto : Scholastic Canada, c1997. 0590123785 (pbk.) 180 p.

Subjects: Homeless persons – Fiction ; Canadian authors ; Street life – Fiction ; Identity (Psychology) – Fiction ; Mothers — Death – Fiction ; Elderly — Care – Fiction ; Mental illness – Fiction ; Homelessness – Fiction ; Canadian authors ; Vancouver (B.C.) — Fiction.

After Sabie’s mother dies, she faces life alone on the streets in Vancouver. She moves in with a mentally ill woman, Estelle, and helps Estelle survive in her home. Sabie learns about family and caring for others while coming to terms with the lessons about life that her mother taught her.

MYRCA nominee 2000. http://www.myrca.ca

362.7 Hyn

Living on the street : Hamilton’s story / by Colin Hynson.

Milwaukee, WI : World Almanac Library, 2005. 0836859618 (lib. bdg.) 48 p. : ill.

Subjects: Rodrigues, Hamilton Correia ; Homeless persons ; Street life ; Poverty — Brazil

Children in crisis (World Almanac Library (Firm))

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Discusses the many reasons why children take to the streets in South American cities and what kind of help is offered to them, particularly looking at one eighteen-year-old’s life on the streets of a city in Brazil.

F Ack

The leaves in October / Karen Ackerman.

New York : Dell, c1991. 0440900492 (pbk.) 117 p.

Subjects: Homeless persons – Fiction ; Single-parent families — Fiction.

A Yearling book.

After her mother leaves them, nine-year-old Livvy struggles to understand and forgive as her father loses his job and takes her and her younger brother to live in a shelter for homeless people.

RL: 4.5.

F Gre

My fabulous new life / Sheila Greenwald.

San Diego : Browndeer Press, c1993. 0152767169 (pbk.) 172 p.

Subjects: Homeless persons – Fiction ; Moving – Fiction ; Apartment houses – Fiction ; Friendship – Fiction ; New York (N.Y.) — Fiction

Eleven-year-old Alison, having moved from the affluent suburbs to an apartment in New York City, tries to make new friends and come to terms with the homelessness she sees all around her.

F Ell

Looking for X / Deborah Ellis.

Toronto : Douglas & McIntyre, c1999. 088899382X (pbk.) 132 p.

Subjects: Homeless persons – Fiction ; Autism – Fiction ; Toronto (Ont.) — Fiction.

Khyber is a smart, independent 11-year-old with an ex-stripper mom and autistic twin brothers. From a poor neighbourhood, she doesn’t have much in common with the kids at school: her best friends are a mean waitress and X, a homeless woman. Khyber knows life would be better if the family had more money, the boys weren’t so difficult and her mom were happier, but she’s content with her life–until her world falls apart.

F Sku

Undergrounders / David Skuy.

Toronto : Scholastic Canada, c2011. 9781443107280 (pbk.) 194 p.

Subjects: Mothers — Death – Fiction ; Homeless teenagers – Fiction ; Street life – Fiction ; Hockey – Fiction ; Canadian authors.

After his mom dies, and the landlord kicks him out, 12-year-old Jonathan faces the loneliness and danger of life on the streets — until he meets Lewis. Lewis takes him under his wing and leads him to his new home among a group of kids living in an abandoned underground shopping mall who call themselves the “Undergrounders”.

MYRCA nominee 2013. http://www.myrca.ca

http://davidskuy.com/

Violence and Abuse

F Orc

Something girl / Beth Goobie.

Victoria, BC : Orca Book, c2005. 1551433478 (pbk.) 105 p.

Subjects: Child abuse ; High interest-low vocabulary books ; Self-esteem – Fiction ; Canadian authors.

Orca soundings.

Sophie is in a lot of trouble. She is on probation for stealing and is doing poorly at school. Her mom doesn’t really talk to her, and the other adults in her life are pressuring Sophie to talk about her bruises. Sophie worries that if she tells, she will be sent to live in a group home. Her friend Jujube is the only person who knows the truth, and now Jujube, too, wants Sophie to speak up.

Click here to read part of this book online

F Ake

Of things not seen / Don Aker.

Toronto : Stoddart, c1995. 0773674357 (pbk.) 197 p.

Subjects: Canadian authors ; Child abuse — Fiction.

Ben’s world is falling apart again, all because his teacher has taken an interest in his writing. Ben cannot afford to draw attention to himself and his family. After so many new starts he cannot face another move–especially now that he has found Anne.

MYRCA nominee 1998. http://www.myrca.ca

F Wyn

The maestro : a novel / Tim Wynne-Jones.

Vancouver, B.C. : Douglas & McIntyre, c1995.0888992637 (pbk.) 223 p.

Subjects; Canadian authors ; Runaway teenagers – Fiction ; Child abuse – Fiction ; Father-son relationship — Fiction.

Australian title: The flight of Burl Crow.
UK title: The survival game.

Fleeing from his brutal father, fourteen-year-old Burl arrives at the remote cabin of an eccentric genius who in just one day changes the young man’s life forever.

RL: 4.6.

Governor General’s Literary Award winner.
MYRCA nominee 1998. http://www.myrca.ca

http://www.timwynne-jones.com/

F Cho

Good idea gone bad / Lesley Choyce.

Halifax, Nova Scotia : Formac Pub., c1993. 0887802397 (pbk.) 137 p.

Subjects: Canadian authors ; Bands (Music) – Fiction ; Violence – Fiction ; Prejudices – Fiction ; Racism – Fiction ; Peer pressure – Fiction ; Rock music – Fiction ; Halifax (N.S.) — Fiction.

Mick and his pals spend their time picking on and beating up the weak. He’s bored and he hates anyone different, well almost anyone. Dariana, the girl of his dreams, is definitely different from him. She believes in people and in individualism. Dariana doesn’t want anything to do with Mick, but she knows he’s a good drummer. Dariana and her friend Alex form two-thirds of a band. Mick would complement things nicely, if he can learn to get along. Mick, Dariana and Alex put together Good Idea Gone Bad, a band that first shakes up their high school and then the Halifax music scene.

MYRCA nominee 1996. http://www.myrca.ca

F Had

Don’t you dare read this, Mrs. Dunphrey / Margaret Peterson Haddix.

New York : Aladdin Paperbacks, c1996. 0689800975 (pbk.)125 p.

Subjects: Child abuse – Fiction ; Father-daughter relationship – Fiction ; Diaries — Fiction

In the journal she is keeping for English class, sixteen-year-old Tish chronicles the changes in her life when her abusive father returns home after a two-year absence.

Click here to read part of this book online

F Lyn

Iceman / Chris Lynch.

New York : HarperTrophy, 1995. 0064471144 (pbk.) 181 p.

Subjects: Hockey – Fiction ; Parent-child relationship – Fiction ; Violence in sports — Fiction.

Fourteen-year-old Eric, a ruthless hockey player prone to violence on the ice, tries to reconcile his own needs with those of his parents

F Lyn

Who the man / Chris Lynch.

New York : HarperCollins, 2002. 0066239389 (pbk.) 186 p.

Subjects: Anger – Fiction ; Violence – Fiction ; Interpersonal relations – Fiction ; Family life – Fiction ; Maturation (Psychology) – Fiction ; School stories.

Thirteen-year-old Earl Pryor is much too big for his age, and much too powerful for the anger that rages within him when classmates tease him, the girl he likes disappoints him, or his parents’ problems get too real.

Back to Top

Among the Hidden / by Margaret Patterson Haddix

In a future where the Population Police enforce the law limiting a family to only two children, Luke has lived all his twelve years in isolation and fear on his family’s farm, until another “third” convinces him that the government is wrong.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/haddix_among.htm ; http://www.multcolib.org/talk/guides-amongthehidden.html ; http://booktalkingcolorado.ppld.org/scripts/FullRecord.asp?ID=276

 City of Ember / by Jeanne DePrau

In the year 241, twelve-year-old Lina trades jobs on Assignment Day to be a Messenger to run to new places in her decaying but beloved city, perhaps even to glimpse Unknown Regions.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.multcolib.org/talk/guides-ember.html ; http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/duprau_city.htm

House of the Scorpion / by Nancy Farmer

In a future where humans despise clones, Matt enjoys special status as the young clone of El Patrón, the 142-year-old leader of a corrupt drug empire nestled between Mexico and the United States.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.multcolib.org/talk/guides-scorpion.html ; http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/framer_house.htm

 Cloning Miranda / by Carol Matas

Miranda suddenly learns that she’s dying from a mysterious disease and later uncovers a truth that may be far worse than anything they could have imagined–Miranda’s parents are preparing to have her cloned!

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.umanitoba.ca/cm/vol6/no6/cloningmiranda.html ; http://www.scholastic.ca/titles/cloningmiranda/

 Off the Road / by Nina Bawden

In 2040, eleven-year-old Tom follows his grandfather through the Wall and into the forbidden Wild, where they seek to find his grandfather’s boyhood home.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.readingmatters.co.uk/book.php?id=25 ; http://lastdystopia.blogspot.ca/2010/01/off-road-by-nina-bawden.html

 Taken / by Edward Bloor

In 2035 kidnapping rich children has become an industry, but when thirteen-year-old Charity Meyers is taken and held for ransom, she soon discovers that this particular kidnapping is not what it seems.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.bookbrowse.com/reviews/index.cfm/book_number/2069/taken ; http://bookswarm.blogspot.ca/2011/02/teen-review-taken-by-edward-bloor.html

Turnabout / by Margaret Paterson Haddix

After secretly receiving injections at the age of 100 that are meant to reverse the aging process, Melly and Anny Beth grow younger until, as teenagers, they try to find a guardian to take care of them as they return to infancy.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.multcolib.org/talk/guides-turnabout.html ; http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/haddix_turnabout.htm ; http://booktalkingcolorado.ppld.org/scripts/FullRecord.asp?ID=226

Away is a strange place to be / by H. M. Hoover

When she is kidnapped from the Earth in 2349 to serve as slave labor on an artificial world under construction, twelve-year-old Abby must cooperate with her fellow prisoner Bryan, a spoiled rich boy, in order to plan an escape.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.amazon.com/Away-Is-Strange-Place-Be/dp/0525445056 ; http://books.google.ca/books/about/Away_Is_a_Strange_Place_to_Be.html?id=kxbAPAAACAAJ&redir_esc=y ; https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/hm-hoover/away-is-a-strange-place-to-be/#review

Girl Who Owned a City / by O. T. Nelson

When a plague sweeps over the earth killing everyone except children under twelve, ten-year-old Lisa organizes a group to rebuild a new way of life.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13022967-the-girl-who-owned-a-city ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l54DdsX5F4M&feature=related&safe=active

 Larklight / by Philip Reeve

In an alternate Victorian England, young Arthur and his sister Myrtle, residents of Larklight, a floating house in one of Her Majesty’s outer space territories, uncover a spidery plot to destroy the solar system.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/reeve_larklight.htm ; http://www.kidsreads.com/reviews/larklight-a-rousing-tale-of-dauntless-pluck-in-the-farthest-reaches-of-space

War of the Worlds / by H. G. Wells

When a Martian spacecraft lands on Woking Common, mankind is terrorized by aliens in tall, armored capsules which stalk the countryside on three legs. The machines wreak havoc on London and the Southern Counties, and survivors are driven underground. Scientist John Nicholson tells how he was plunged into a paralyzing nightmare of stark terror, savage madness and utter destruction.

[This book is available in so many different versions: original, adapted novel, graphic novel, etc. that I will leave it up to you to find a review for the edition you have in hand.]

Divergent / by Veronica Roth

In a future Chicago, sixteen-year-old Beatrice Prior must choose among five predetermined factions to define her identity for the rest of her life, a decision made more difficult when she discovers that she is an anomaly who does not fit into any one group, and that the society she lives in is not perfect after all.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.harpercollins.ca/books/Divergent-Veronica-Roth?isbn=9780062024022&HCHP=TB_Divergent ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fFmccRGMGM&safe=active

Kindling / by Jennifer Armstrong and Nancy Butcher

In 2007, a small band of children have joined together in a Florida town, trying to survive in a world where it seems that all the adults have been killed off by a catastrophic virus.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/armstrong_kindling.htm ; http://www.amazon.com/The-Kindling-Fire-us-Trilogy-Book/dp/0064472736 ; http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/a/jennifer-armstrong/kindling.htm

Ender’s game / by Orson Scott Card

The human race faces annihilation. An alien menace is hovering on the horizon, ready to strike. And if humanity is to be defended, the government must create the greatest military commander in history. The brilliant young Ender Wiggin is their last hope. But first he must survive the rigours of a brutal military training program – to prove that he can be the leader of all leaders. A saviour for mankind must be produced, through whatever means possible. But will they create a hero or a monster? Read to find out!

Booktalks and Reviews: http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/card_game.htm ; http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/may/14/enders-game-scott-card-review

The secret under my skin / by Janet McNaughton

In the year 2368, humans exist under dire environmental conditions and one young woman, rescued from a work camp and chosen for a special duty, uses her love of learning to discover the truth about the planet’s future and her own dark past.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://booktalkingcolorado.ppld.org/scripts/FullRecord.asp?ID=507 ; http://www.janetmcnaughton.ca/suspreview.htm ; http://www.powells.com/biblio/17-006008989x-1

 The dead and the gone / by Susan Beth Pfeffer

After a meteor hits the moon and sets off a series of horrific climate changes, seventeen-year-old Alex Morales must take care of his sisters alone in the chaos of New York City.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/pfeffer_dead.htm ; http://readingfool.blogspot.ca/2008/04/dead-gone-booktalk.html

 Hole in the sky / by Pete Hautman

In a future world ravaged by a mutant virus, sixteen-year-old Ceej and three other teenagers seek to save the Grand Canyon from being flooded, while trying to avoid capture by a band of renegade Survivors.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-689-83118-8 ; http://youngadultsciencefiction.blogspot.ca/2009/02/hole-in-sky-by-pete-hautman.html

 Empty / by Suzanne Weyn

When, just ten years in the future, oil supplies run out and global warming leads to devastating storms, senior high school classmates Tom, Niki, Gwen, Hector, and Brock realize that the world as they know it is ending and lead the way to a more environmentally-friendly society.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://dreaminginbooks.blogspot.ca/2010/10/review-empty-by-suzanne-weyn.html ; http://luxuryreading.com/empty/

End of days / by Eric Walters

It’s 2012 and an asteroid is racing towards the planet, threatening to extinguish humanity as we know it. The world’s most important astrophysicists, astronomers, and theoretical mathematicians have been taken to a secret location and are desperately working to avoid a catastrophe, but it’s only when Billy, a 16-year-old with rare gifts, is recruited to the cause that they can hope to prevail over evil and return themselves–and the Earth–to safety.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://cannonballread4.wordpress.com/2012/01/31/dragondreamsjens-cbr4-review-11-end-of-days-by-eric-walters/ ; http://boysdoread.blogspot.ca/2011/11/end-of-days-by-eric-walters.html

 Dead Water Zone / by Kenneth Oppel

Muscular sixteen-year-old Paul tries to find his genetically stunted younger brother Sam in the polluted ruins of Watertown, where Sam is trying to cure himself with toxic “dead water” that alters the metabolism of those who drink it.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.umanitoba.ca/cm/cmarchive/vol20no6/deadwaterzone.html ; https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/kenneth-oppel/dead-water-zone/

The Big Empty / by J.B. Stephens

After half of the world’s population is killed by a plague, seven teenagers seek a better life in a nightmarish future by deciphering coded messages and trying to avoid the Slashers.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://literaryreflections.blogspot.ca/2008/03/big-empty-by-jb-stephens.html ; http://inkweaver-review.blogspot.ca/2008/09/big-empty-by-jb-stephens.html ; http://www.worldcat.org/title/big-empty/oclc/54826339 ; http://www.worldcat.org/title/big-empty/oclc/54826339

 Virtual War / Gloria Skurzynski

In a future world where global contamination has necessitated limited human contact, three young people with unique genetically engineered abilities are teamed up to wage a war in virtual reality.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://booktalkingcolorado.ppld.org/scripts/FullRecord.asp?ID=612 ; http://gloriabooks.com/virtual.html ; http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-689-81374-0 ; http://books.simonandschuster.ca/Virtual-War/Gloria-Skurzynski/9781439116081

Escape the Mask / David Ward

Six young friends, tortured by the Spears and forced to work as slaves in the harsh fields of Grassland, vow to escape to find the freedom that was stolen from them long ago, and their opportunity arises when Outsiders come and wage war against the Spears.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/ward_escape.htm ; http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2705629-escape-the-mask ; http://jkrbooks.typepad.com/blog/2008/12/escape-the-mask-david-ward.html

Hybrids / by David Thorpe

A thrilling sci-fi novel set in a believable — and terrifying — near future!

Booktalks and Reviews: http://www.thebookbag.co.uk/reviews/index.php?title=Hybrids_by_David_Thorpe ; http://www.readingmatters.co.uk/book.php?id=301 ; http://www.davidthorpe.info/hybrids.htm

Them / by K. A. Applegate

In 2011, an asteroid is on a collision course with the earth. Only eighty people will leave the planet before the world ends.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remnants ; http://www.brightdreamer.com/bdbooks/abc/applegate.html#AppRem

Gone / by Michael Grant

In a small town on the coast of California, everyone over the age of fourteen suddenly disappears, setting up a battle between the remaining town residents and the students from a local private school, as well as those who have “The Power” and are able to perform supernatural feats and those who do not.

Booktalks and Reviews: http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/grant_gone.htm ; http://athomewithbooks.net/2011/08/gone-by-michael-grant-review/ ; http://yabookreads.com/blog/2011/12/21/gone-michael-grant/

 The Edge of When / by Carol Matas

Rebecca worries about the things a normal 12-year-old girl would worry about: starting junior high, her friends, her family. But when she witnesses a kidnapping and finds herself transported into a terrifying world of the future, she not only must find her way home, she must figure out a way to alter the course of history.

Booktalks and Reviews: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/carol-matas/edge-when/ ; http://carol-matas.blogspot.ca/2011/10/my-newold-book-edge-of-when.html

This list is predominantly comprised of MYRCA (Manitoba Young Readers’ Choice Award) nominees and winners (past and present) that have an emphasis on teen issues. Also note that these are all Canadian titles.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA)


“In 1990, the Manitoba School Library Association decided to mark the International Year of Literacy by developing a literacy initiative that would have a positive and lasting impact on [readers like you].” The Manitoba Young Readers’ Choice Award was born. It is important to note that every year, the winner of this award is not chosen by adults, but rather by people like you! Only students in grades 5-8 can vote for which book they think should win the award.

I have separated these award winning books into 4 categories:

  1. Death, Grief, Disabilities and Illness
  2. Family Relationships
  3. Bullies, Fitting In

Group #1

Call #: F Hut
Author: Hutchins, H. J.
Title: After : a novel / Hazel Hutchins.
Publisher: Montréal : Smith, Bonappétit & Son, c2008.
ISBN: 9781897118429 :
Pages: 198 p.
Subject: Teenagers — Death — Fiction.

Grief — Fiction

Guilt — Fiction.

Courage — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Tragedies — Fiction.

Choice (Psychology) — Fiction.

Summary: When a random shooting plunges the families of both victim and perpetrator into intense grief, two young teens from very different backgrounds struggle to rebuild their lives.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2010.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca/

Book review:    http://umanitoba.ca/cm/vol15/no13/afteranovel.html

Call #: F Hol
Author: Holubitsky, Katherine,1955-.
Title: Alone at ninety foot / Katherine Holubitsky.
Publisher: Victoria : Orca, c1999.
ISBN: 1551431297 :
Pages: 169 p.
Subject: Suicide — Fiction.

Mothers — Death — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Father-daughter relationship — Fiction.

Tragedies — Fiction.

Summary: Fourteen-year-old Pamela Collins is struggling to deal with something none of us ever want to deal with, let alone as a teenager. She’s thoughtful, funny, tearful and angry as she tries to come to terms with her mother’s death.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2001.
CLA (Canadian Library Association) Young Adult Book Award 2000 winner.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Wal
Author: Walters, Eric,1957-.
Title: Rebound / Eric Walters.
Publisher: Toronto : Stoddart Kids, 2000.
ISBN: 0773674853 (pbk.) :
Pages: 262 p.
Subject: Quadriplegics — Fiction.

People with disabilities — Fiction.

Friendship — Fiction

Basketball — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Summary: Sean, who is trying to keep out of trouble and make the basketball team, must accompany David, who uses a wheelchair after a spinal cord injury but who is still the better player, to class and the boys come to realize they have more in common than they thought.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2002.
WWW: http://www.ericwalters.net
http://www.myrca.ca

Book review:    http://www.powells.com/biblio/1-9780773674851-1

Call #: F Buf
Author: Buffie, Margaret.
Title: Angels turn their backs / Margaret Buffie.
Publisher: Toronto : Kids Can Press, c1998.
ISBN: 1550744178 :
Pages: 239 p.
Subject: Canadian fiction.

Divorce — Fiction

Panic attacks — Fiction.

Agoraphobia — Fiction.

Canadian authors — Manitoba.

Summary: Addy Jarrick, a smart, talented and funny fifteen-year-old, has her world turned upside down when her parents split up and she moves with her mother away from Toronto, causing her to have panic attacks and hear voices.
Awards: MYRCA 2001 honor book winner.
Red Maple Award nominee.
McNally Robinson Book for Young People Award nominee.
WWW: http://buffie.netfirms.com/
http://www.myrca.ca/

Call #: F Mcb
Author: McBay, Bruce,1946-.
Title: Waiting for Sarah / Bruce McBay & James Heneghan.
Publisher: Victoria, BC : Orca Book Publishers, 2003.
ISBN: 1551432706 :
Pages: 170 p.
Subject: People with disabilities — Fiction.

Ghost stories

Grief — Fiction

Traffic accidents — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Love stories

Add. Entries: Heneghan, James, 1930-.
Summary: After teenager Mike Scott loses his family and his legs in a car accident, he withdraws until he meets the mysterious Sarah, a girl who is not what she seems.
Awards: MYRCA Winner 2005.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Por
Author: Porter, Pamela,1956-.
Title: The crazy man / Pamela Porter.
Publisher: Toronto : Groundwood Books, c2005.
ISBN: 0888996950 (pbk.) :
Pages: 214 p.
Subject: Accidents — Fiction

Novels in verse

Prejudices — Fiction.

Canadian fiction.

Summary: Twelve-year-old Emaline Bitterman’s life is turned upside down when a farming accident leaves her permanently disabled, and her father, plagued with guilt, leaves her and her distraught mother on their own.
Awards: Silver Birch Award 2007 nominated title.
Golden Oak Award 2007 nominated title.
Winner Golden Oak Award 2007.
MYRCA 2007 winner.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Bre
Author: Brenna, Beverley A.
Title: Wild orchid / Beverley Brenna.
Publisher: Calgary, AB : Red Deer Press, 2006, c2005.
ISBN: 0889953309 :
Pages: 156 p.
Subject: Mental illness — Fiction

Asperger’s syndrome — Fiction.

Interpersonal relations — Fiction

Autism — Fiction.

Mother-daughter relationship — Fiction.

Canadian fiction.

Summary: When Taylor’s mother offers to work in her boyfriend’s restaurant one summer, it presents a lot of problems for Taylor–who has an autistic condition–as she is forced to move to a new place, explore on her own, and try to make friends.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2007.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Fro
Author: Froese, Deborah,1957-.
Title: Out of the fire / by Deborah Froese.
Publisher: Toronto : Sumach Press, c2001.
ISBN: 1894549090 :
Pages: 282 p.
Subject: Burns and scalds — Patients — Canada — Fiction.

Friendship — Fiction.

Social acceptance — Fiction.

Grandmothers — Fiction.

Life change events — Fiction.

Personal appearance — Fiction.

Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Summary: Life finally seems good to sixteen-year-old Dayle. No longer a self-conscious bookworm, she’s captured the attention of Keith, the perfect dream boyfriend. Her worries are the same as those of most teens her age. She wants to stay friends with her long-time best friend Amy while pursuing the excitment of her relationship with Keith. At the same time, she has to fend off the embarrassing overtures of another friend Stu, and tend to her schoolwork and the usual demands of family. But suddenly Dayle’s world turns inside out when a moment of carelessness causes tragedy. She is badly burned, and one of her friends is gravely injured. Stage by stage and day by day, Dayle endures, drawing strength from her family and friends and sustained by the memory of a strong and loving grandmother.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2003.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Booktalks:     http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/froese_out.htm

http://www.pioneervalley.k12.ma.us/Library/OBrien/out%20of%20the%20fire.htm

Call #: F Sla
Author: Slade, Arthur G.
Title: Tribes / Arthur Slade.
Publisher: Toronto : HarperTrophyCanada, c2002.
ISBN: 0006391702 :
Pages: 165 p.
Subject: High school students — Fiction.

Cliques (Sociology) — Fiction.

Suicide — Fiction.

Anthropology — Fiction.

Self-mutilation — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Subject: Saskatoon (Sask.) — Fiction.
Summary: For Percy, the loss of his father and the suicide of his best friend build to a head during the last week before high school graduation.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2004.
WWW: http://arthurslade.com/frontpage/
http://www.myrca.ca

Group #2

Call #: F Buf
Author: Buffie, Margaret.
Title: Who is Frances Rain? / by Margaret Buffie.
Publisher: Toronto : Kids Can Press, c1987.
ISBN: 0919964834 :
Pages: 192 p.
Subject: Ghost stories

Family life — Fiction.

Vacations — Fiction.

Canadian authors — Manitoba.

Summary: It’s going to be a long, hot summer for 15-year-old Lizzie. Normally a vacation at her grandmother’s cottage is the highlight of the year. But not this summer, especially not when her mother and new stepfather decide to come along. But when Lizzie decides to explore Rain Island to get away from all the family bickering, she finds an old pair of glasses that give her the ability to see ghosts from the past.
Awards: CLA (Canadian Library Association) Young Adult Book Award 1988 winner.
WWW: http://buffie.netfirms.com/

Book reviews:    http://www.umanitoba.ca/cm/cmarchive/vol16no2/whoisfrances.html

http://karynskidlitreviews.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/who-is-frances-rain-1987-by-margaret-buffie/

Call #: F Bel
Author: Bell, William,1945-.
Title: Zack / William Bell.
Publisher: Toronto : Doubleday, c1998.
ISBN: 0385257112 :
Pages: 165 p.
Subject: Race relations — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Blacks — Fiction.

Slaves — Fiction

Grandfathers — Fiction.

Summary: The son of a Jewish father and black mother, high school senior Zack has never been allowed to meet his mother’s family, but after doing a research project on a former slave, he travels from his home in Canada to Natchez, Mississippi to find his grandfather.
Awards: Mr. Christie’s Book Award.

Call #: F Nie
Author: Nielsen-Fernlund, Susin,1964-.
Title: Dear George Clooney, please marry my mom / Susin Nielsen.
Publisher: New York : Tundra Books, c2010.
ISBN: 9780887769771 :
Pages: 229 p.
Subject: Divorce — Fiction

Stepfamilies — Fiction.

Single-parent families — Fiction.

Interpersonal relations — Fiction

Canadian authors.

Mother-daughter relationship — Fiction.

Summary: When Violet’s television-director father leaves Vancouver to live in L.A. with his new wife, and her mother’s relationships seem to be going from bad to worse, Violet decides to help her mother get the perfect man–George Clooney.
Awards: MYRCA nominee title 2012.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca/

Call #: F Bel
Author: Belgue, Nancy,1951-.
Title: Soames on the range / Nancy Belgue.
Publisher: Toronto : HarperTrophyCanada, c2006.
ISBN: 9780002007689 (pbk.) :
Pages: 203 p.
Subject: Uncles — Fiction.

Family life — Canada — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Ranch life — Fiction.

Homosexuality — Fiction.

LGBTQ

Subject: Rocky Mountains, Canadian (B.C. and Alta.) — Fiction.
Summary: Soames, a young kid from a dysfunctional family and recently suspended from school, moves in with his uncle who lives on a Rocky Mountain ranch.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2009.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca/

Call #: F Ghe
Author: Ghent, Natale,1962-.
Title: No small thing / Natale Ghent.
Publisher: Toronto, ON : HarperTrophyCanada, c2003.
ISBN: 0006392776 :
Pages: 232 p.
Subject: Canadian authors.

Siblings — Fiction.

Ponies — Fiction.

Horses — Fiction

Single-parent families — Fiction.

Poverty — Fiction.

Subject: Ontario — History — 20th century — Fiction.
Summary: In Ontario in 1977, twelve-year-old Nat and his sisters find that owning, training, and caring for a pony they acquired for free makes it easier to cope with the poverty they have faced since their father abandoned them.
Awards: Hackmatack Children’s Choice Book Award winner.
Silver Birch award (Honour Book).
WWW: http://www.nataleghent.com/

Call #: F Wyn
Author: Wynne-Jones, Tim.
Title: The maestro : a novel / Tim Wynne-Jones.
Publisher: Vancouver, B.C. : Douglas & McIntyre, c1995.
ISBN: 0888992637 :
Pages: 223 p.
Subject: Canadian authors.

Runaway teenagers — Fiction

Child abuse — Fiction.

Father-son relationship — Fiction

Note: “A Groundwood book.”.
Australian title: The flight of Burl Crow.
UK title: The survival game.
Summary: Fleeing from his brutal father, fourteen-year-old Burl arrives at the remote cabin of an eccentric genius who in just one day changes the young man’s life forever.
Read. Prog.: RL: 4.6.
Awards: Governor General’s Literary Award winner.
MYRCA nominee 1998.
WWW: http://www.timwynne-jones.com/
http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Wal
Author: Walters, Eric,1957-.
Title: Run / Eric Walters.
Publisher: Toronto : Viking Canada, 2003.
ISBN: 0670044385 :
Pages: 214 p.
Subject: Fox, Terry, 1958-1981. — Fiction.
Subject: Canadian authors.

Marathon running — Fiction.

Friendship — Fiction

Juvenile delinquency — Fiction.

Father-son relationship — Fiction

Journalists — Fiction.

Cancer — Patients — Fiction.

Note: “With a foreword by the Fox family”–Cover.
Summary: Winston MacDonald, a troubled teen who has been suspended from school, spends some time traveling with his father, a newspaper columnist who is covering the early stages of Terry Fox’s Marathon of Hope.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2005.
WWW: http://www.ericwalters.net
http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Ell
Author: Ellis, Sarah.
Title: Odd man out / Sarah Ellis.
Publisher: Toronto : Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press, c2006.
ISBN: 0888997035 (pbk.) :
Pages: 162 p.
Subject: Mental illness — Fiction

Canadian authors.

Family — Fiction

Cousins — Fiction.

Imagination — Fiction.

Spy stories

Humorous fiction

Subject: British Columbia — Fiction.
Summary: While staying with his grandmother and five female cousins for the summer, twelve-year-old Kip finds a journal written by his deceased father and is shattered when he learns that his father suffered from paranoia and delusions.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2008.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca/

Call #: F Mac
Author: MacDonald, Jake,1949-.
Title: Juliana and the medicine fish / a novel by Jake MacDonald ; [digital illustration by Angie Zubrin].
Publisher: Winnipeg : Great Plains Fiction, c1997.
ISBN: 0969780443 :
Pages: 150 p.
Subject: Canadian authors — Manitoba.

Divorce — Fiction

Ojibwa (First Nations people) — Fiction.

Father-daughter relationship — Fiction.

Native peoples — Manitoba — Fiction.

Add. Entries: Zubrin, Angie.
Summary: While spending the summer trying to deal with her parent’s divorce, Juliana, with the help of her Ojibwa friend, uncovers an ancient secret that helps her reconcile with her father and acquire a new appreciation for the dangerous beauty of Canada’s north country.
Awards: Red Cedar Award Nominee 1999-2000.
On the Same Page–Read Manitoba 2010-2011 choice.
MYRCA nominee 2000.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Reader’s guide: http://wpl.winnipeg.ca/library/pdfs/OTSPReadersGuide.pdf

Group #3

Call #: F Gil
Author: Gilmore, Rachna,1953-.
Title: A friend like Zilla / by Rachna Gilmore ; illustrations by Alice Priestly.
Publisher: Toronto : Second Story Press, c1995.
ISBN: 0929005716 :
Pages: 133 p. :
Subject: Canadian authors.

People with disabilities — Fiction.

Friendship — Fiction

Prejudices — Fiction

Summary: Nobby meets the older Zilla when her family goes on holiday. Zilla is developmentally disabled, but much more fun than the average teenager. The friendship grows until Uncle Chad shows up. He is snooty and sometimes unthinkingly cruel to Zilla. Prejudices and attitudes take a surprising turn when Uncle Chad gets hurt during a storm and it is Zilla who generously comes to the rescue.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 1998.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Wyn
Author: Wynne-Jones, Tim.
Title: Rex Zero, the great pretender / Tim Wynne-Jones.
Publisher: Toronto : Groundwood Books, c2009.
ISBN: 9780888999467 (pbk.) :
Pages: 224 p.
Subject: Moving — Fiction

School stories.

Bullies — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Family life — Canada — Fiction.

Subject: Ottawa (Ont.) — Fiction.
Summary: Just as Rex Zero is looking forward to starting grade seven with his band of close friends, he learns that his family is moving again. In desperation, he concocts an elaborate strategy that will allow him to stay in his old school district. In addition to this, Rex must deal with the school bully.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2011.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca/

Call #: F Mac
Author: MacLean, Jill.
Title: The present tense of Prinny Murphy / Jill MacLean.
Publisher: Brighton, MA : Fitzhenry & Whiteside, c2010.
ISBN: 9781554551453 (pbk.) :
Pages: 230 p.
Subject: Bullies — Fiction.

Friendship — Fiction

Alcoholism — Fiction.

School stories.

Poetry — Fiction.

Books and reading — Fiction.

Reading disability — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Note: Sequel to The nine lives of Travis Keating.
Summary: Prinny Murphy is dealing with an alcoholic mother, losing a best friend, bullies, and a reading problem, but when a substitute teacher introduces her to a special book she realizes life is full of possibilities and poetry.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2012.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca/

Call #: F Wit
Author: Withrow, Sarah,1966-.
Title: The black sunshine of Goody Pryne / Sarah Withrow.
Publisher: Toronto : Douglas & McIntyre, c2003.
ISBN: 0888995776 (pbk.) :
Pages: 177 p.
Subject: Bullies — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Emotionally disturbed children — Fiction.

Friendship — Fiction

Grief — Fiction

Fathers — Death — Fiction.

Interpersonal relations — Fiction

Summary: Unable to get over the death of his father two year before, reclusive Stevie Walters finds his life at a standstill until he is befriended by big, abrasive, loud-mouthed Goody Pryne whose overwhelming personality and bullying manner energize him in unexpected ways.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2005.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca/

Book review:    http://www.umanitoba.ca/outreach/cm/vol10/no7/theblacksunshineofgoodypryne.html

Call #: F Kha
Author: Khan, Rukhsana.
Title: Dahling, if you luv me, would you please, please smile / Rukhsana Khan.
Publisher: Toronto : Stoddart, c1999.
ISBN: 0773760164 :
Pages: 206 p.
Subject: Muslims — Canada — Fiction.

Self-confidence — Fiction.

High schools — Fiction.

Interpersonal relations — Fiction.

Summary: Zainab, a young North American Muslim, has many difficulties making friends at school. When one of her teachers offers to let her direct the upcoming school play, Zainab’s desire to fit in leads her to cast the school’s most popular boy, Kevin, despite another student’s incredible audition. The cast’s success brings her respect and she learns to be more confident.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2001.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Book review:    http://www.rukhsanakhan.com/books/dahlingifyouluvme.html

Call #: F Fri
Author: Friesen, Gayle.
Title: Men of stone / by Gayle Friesen.
Publisher: Toronto : Kids Can Press, c2000.
ISBN: 1550747827 (pbk.) :
Pages: 216 p.
Subject: Bullies — Fiction.

Family life — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Anger — Fiction.

Determination (Personality trait) — Fiction.

Summary: Fifteen-year-old Ben can’t make sense of his life, until he learns about his Great-Aunt Frieda’s life in Russia and her courage to deal with Stalin’s agents, The Men of Stone.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2002.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Law
Author: Lawrence, Iain,1955-.
Title: Ghost boy / Iain Lawrence.
Publisher: New York : Delacorte Press, 2000.
ISBN: 0385327390 :
Pages: 326 p.
Subject: Canadian authors.

Albinos and albinism — Fiction.

Circus — Fiction.

Elephants — Fiction.

Runaway teenagers — Fiction

Self-acceptance — Fiction.

Summary: Unhappy in a home seemingly devoid of love, a fourteen-year-old albino boy who thinks of himself as Harold the Ghost runs away to join the circus, where he works with the elephants and searches for a sense of who he is.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2002.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Sco
Author: Scott, Mary Ann,1936-.
Title: New girl / by Mary Ann Scott.
Publisher: Markham, Ont. : Fitzhenry & Whiteside, c2003.
ISBN: 1550417274 :
1550417258 :
Pages: 208 p.
Subject: City and town life — Fiction.

Grandparent-grandchild relationship — Fiction.

School stories.

Canadian authors.

Moving — Fiction

Summary: A young teenage girl moves from the country to a big city and struggles with adjusting to a new school, making new friends in an ethnic community, and a new living situation with her grandmother.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2005.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Jai
Author: Jaimet, Kate,1969-.
Title: Dunces Anonymous / Kate Jaimet.
Publisher: Victoria, BC : Orca Book Publishers, c2009.
ISBN: 1554690978 (pbk.)
9781554690978 :
Pages: 157 p.
Subject: Friendship — Fiction

Clubs — Fiction.

School stories.

Canadian authors.

Humorous fiction

Summary: Josh and his new friends, Wang and Magnolia, form a club called Dunces Anonymous so they can get out of doing the things their parents expect of them, like becoming class president or playing Juliet in the school play.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2011.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

From the publisher: http://www.orcabook.com/productdetails.cfm?PC=635

Call #: F Bel
Author: Bell, William,1945-.
Title: The blue helmet : a novel / William Bell.
Publisher: [Toronto] : Doubleday Canada, c2006.
ISBN: 0385662467 :
Pages: 167 p.
Subject: Juvenile delinquency — Fiction.

Father-son relationship — Fiction

Single-parent families — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Gangs — Fiction.

Subject: Toronto (Ont.) — Fiction.
Summary: When Lee’s initiation into the Tarantula gang goes wrong and he is caught robbing an auto supply store, his father ships him off to his aunt’s in Toronto. Lee is used to being alone. His mother died of cancer and his father has held down two jobs. Now he feels more alone than ever. But though he resists his Aunt Reena and the crazy clientele of Reena’s Unique Cafe, he finds himself warming to his new environment. An unusual friendship forces him to come to terms with the effects of violence and the impact of his own aggression.
Awards: White Pine Award 2008 nominated title.
CLA Young Adult Canadian Book Award winner.
MYRCA nominee 2008.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Group #4

Call #: F Ell
Author: Ellis, Deborah,1960-.
Title: The heaven shop / Deborah Ellis.
Publisher: Markham, Ont. : Fitzhenry & Whiteside, c2004.
ISBN: 1550419072 (pbk.) :
Pages: 186 p.
Subject: AIDS (Disease) — Fiction.

Orphans — Malawi — Fiction.

Grandparents — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Children of AIDS patients — Malawi — Fiction.

Subject: Africa — Fiction.
Summary: Binti and her siblings are orphaned when their father dies of AIDS. Split up and sent to relatives all over Malawi, they suffer increasing hardship until they are reunited through the influence of their formidable grandmother.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2006.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Pea
Author: Pearson, Kit,1947-.
Title: Awake and dreaming / Kit Pearson.
Publisher: New York : Puffin Books, c1996.
ISBN: 014038166X (pbk.) :
Pages: 244 p.
Subject: Mother-daughter relationship — Fiction.

Dreams — Fiction.

Adoption — Fiction

Canadian authors.

Summary: While living a miserable, poverty-stricken life with her young, irresponsible mother, nine-year-old Theo dreams of belonging to a real family but finds a shadowy figure haunting her thoughts.
Awards: MYRCA winner 1999.
WWW: http://www.kitpearson.com/
http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Jen
Author: Jennings, Sharon.
Title: Home free / Sharon Jennings.
Publisher: Toronto : Second Story Press, c2009.
ISBN: 9781897187555 (pbk.) :
Pages: 152 p.
Subject: Orphans — Fiction

Summer — Fiction.

Authorship — Fiction.

Friendship — Fiction

Canadian authors.

Note: “A Gutsy girl book.”.
Summary: What Leanna Mets wants to be most is a writer. When Cassandra Jovanovich, an orphan, moves in across the street, she sees her chance. Orphans are so romantic, and makes much good stories, don’t they? But during this fateful summer Leanna finds out that being an orphan may not be as exciting as it appears.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2011.
WWW: http://www.sharonjennings.ca/
http://www.myrca.ca/

Call #: F Lit
Author: Little, Jean,1932-.
Title: Willow and Twig / Jean Little.
Publisher: Toronto : Puffin, c2000.
ISBN: 0141306696 :
Pages: 227 p.
Subject: Canadian authors.

Emotionally disturbed children — Fiction.

Homeless persons — Fiction

Siblings — Fiction.

Subject: Vancouver (B.C.) — Fiction.
Summary: Ten-year-old Willow and her younger, emotionally disturbed brother, Twig, feel like “nobody’s children.” Abandoned by their drug-addicted mother, Angel, they become homeless when their temporary caretaker suddenly dies.
Awards: Mr. Christie’s Book Award 2000 winner.
Canadian Library Association (CLA) Book of the Year for Children Award 2000 shortlist title.

Call #: F Hen
Author: Heneghan, James,1930-.
Title: Bank job / James Heneghan, Norma Charles.
Publisher: Victoria, BC : Orca Book Publishers, c2009.
ISBN: 1551438550
9781551438559 :
Pages: 165 p.
Subject: Bank robberies — Fiction

Foster home care — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Add. Entries: Charles, Norma M.
Summary: Thirteen-year-old Nell and her friends rob banks to raise money for renovations at their foster home.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2011.
WWW: http://www.jamesheneghan.com/
http://www.myrca.ca/

Book reviews:    http://www.quillandquire.com/reviews/review.cfm?review_id=6505

http://www.canadianteachermagazine.com/reviews/young_adult/Bank-Job.shtml

http://www.orcabook.com/productdetails.cfm?PC=590

Call #: F Hor
Author: Horvath, Polly.
Title: Everything on a waffle / Polly Horvath.
Publisher: Toronto : Douglas & McIntyre, c2001.
ISBN: 0888994427 (pbk.) :
Pages: 179 p.
Subject: Self-reliance — Fiction.

Uncles — Fiction.

Foster home care — Fiction.

Interpersonal relations — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Subject: British Columbia — Fiction.
Note: “A Groundwood book.”.
Summary: Eleven-year-old Primrose living in a small fishing village in British Columbia recounts her experiences and all that she learns about human nature and the unpredictability of life in the months after her parents are lost at sea.
Awards: Newbery Honor Book 2002.
MYRCA Nominee 2003.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca/

Call #: F Ell
Author: Ellis, Sarah.
Title: Out of the blue / Sarah Ellis.
Publisher: Toronto : Douglas & McIntyre, 1995, c1994.
ISBN: 088899236X :
Pages: 120 p.
Subject: Adoption — Fiction

Sisters — Fiction

Mother-daughter relationship — Fiction.

Summary: After discovering that she has a twenty-four-year-old half-sister, twelve-year-old Megan finds the well-defined edges of her life disappearing into confusion.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 1997.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Joh
Author: Johnston, Julie.
Title: Adam and Eve and pinch-me / Julie Johnston.
Publisher: Toronto : Stoddart, 1997, c1994.
ISBN: 0773758399 :
Pages: 180 p.
Subject: Foster home care — Fiction.

Interpersonal relations — Fiction

Foster children — Fiction.

Summary: Fifteen-year-old Sara Moone, abandoned at birth and moved from one foster family to another, finds that she cannot remain aloof from her latest family.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 1997.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Bay
Author: Bayless, Maureen,1959-.
Title: No fixed address / Maureen Bayless.
Publisher: Toronto : Scholastic Canada, c1997.
ISBN: 0590123785 :
Pages: 180 p.
Subject: Homeless persons — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Street life — Fiction.

Identity (Psychology) — Fiction.

Mothers — Death — Fiction.

Elderly — Care — Fiction.

Mental illness — Fiction.

Homelessness — Fiction.

Subject: Vancouver (B.C.) — Fiction.
Summary: After Sabie’s mother dies, she faces life alone on the streets in Vancouver. She moves in with a mentally ill woman, Estelle, and helps Estelle survive in her home. Sabie learns about family and caring for others while coming to terms with the lessons about life that her mother taught her.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2000.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Yet
Author: Ye, Ting-xing,1952-.
Title: Throwaway daughter / Ting-xing Ye ; with William Bell.
Publisher: Toronto : Doubleday Canada, c2003.
ISBN: 0385659520 (pbk.) :
Pages: 227 p. :
Subject: Chinese Canadians — Fiction.

Adopted children — Fiction.

Women — China — Social conditions — Fiction.

Canadian authors.

Subject: China — Population — Fiction.
Add. Entries: Bell, William, 1945-.
Summary: A young Chinese Canadian woman, haunted by the fact that she was unwanted and abandoned at a Chinese orphanage, spurns her heritage, until she witnesses the Tiananmen Square massacre on television, and begins a personal journey that takes her to China in search of her birth parents.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2005.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Ols
Author: Olsen, Sylvia,1955-.
Title: White girl / Sylvia Olsen.
Publisher: Winlaw, Canada : Sono Nis Press, c2004.
ISBN: 155039147X (pbk.) :
Pages: 235 p.
Subject: Native peoples — Canada — Fiction.

Race relations — Fiction.

Stepfamilies — Fiction.

First Nations — Fiction.

Summary: Fifteen-year-old Josie Jessop goes from blending into the crowd to being “White Girl” when her mother marries a First Nations man and moves them to his house on a reserve outside the city, where she must come to terms with her new home, new school, and new family amidst very few friendly faces.
Awards: MYRCA Nominee 2006.
WWW: http://sylviaolsen.ca/
http://www.myrca.ca

Call #: F Hus
Author: Huser, Glen,1943-.
Title: Skinnybones and the Wrinkle Queen / Glen Huser.
Publisher: Toronto : Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press, c2006.
ISBN: 0888997337 (pb) :
Pages: 232 p.
Subject: Volunteer work — Fiction.

Elderly — Care — Fiction

Foster children — Fiction.

Summary: At fifteen, Tamara has survived the foster-care system through brains, will and attitude. Thanks to her teacher’s latest community project, she finds herself volunteering at the local senior’s home where she is assigned to Jean Barclay–a cranky, wealthy and extremely frail former school teacher.
Awards: MYRCA nominee 2007.
WWW: http://www.myrca.ca

 

Lisa (formerly Lisa’s War) / by Carol Matas

When Lisa realizes that her older brother, Stefan, has joined the Danish resistance, she insists on helping too. She becomes a secret messenger with the thrilling, terrifying job of distributing leaflets under the very noses of the German soldiers.

But as the war goes on, the German occupation becomes more prevalent and word spreads of Hitler’s vicious campaign against the Jews in neighboring countries. For the Jews of Denmark–including Lisa, who is now fifteen–time is running out; and Lisa and her best friend, Suzanne, set aside their dreams of dating and romance to become full partners in the heart-stopping world of armed resistance.

We are with Lisa for her first mission for the resistance, distributing copies of the underground newspaper. Lisa has moments of joy (dancing with her crush on her birthday) and moments of great sorrow (best friend’s parents are killed by the Germans). Lisa’s last mission is to help get as many Jews out of Denmark when the resistance learns that they are going to be rounded up.

Lisa is a strong, but true character. She has moments of doubt, fear, longing and joy. Her love for her family, friends and country are what give her the strength to do things that no teenager should ever have to do.

Excerpt:

How can I warn these people without endangering us all?

The couples are chatting among themselves about spending Rosh Hashanah with their children and grandchildren. Now I know for sure that they’re Jewish.

Suddenly I get an idea. It’s a natural for me. I put my head between my knees and start to moan a bit. Immediately, both women are huddled around me.

“What is it, my dear? Are you ill?”

“I feel awful,” I say. “Could . . . would one of you take me to the washroom?”

“Yes, yes, of course, dear,” says the older woman.

“No, Mother, you stay here,” the daughter insists. “I’ll take her.”

She puts her arm under mine and leads me out of the compartment. The washroom is down at the end of the corridor. I stop her halfway there. There’s no one around, so I try to talk quickly, before someone happens along.

“I’m all right, really, but I had to talk to you.” Her eyebrows rise.

“I didn’t know if I could talk safely in front of that young man.”

Again she says nothing, but nods and listens.

“Rabbi Melchior announced at services this morning that the Germans will start rounding up the Jews on Rosh Hashanah. I suppose that means tonight or tomorrow. You must warn your family and find somewhere to hide.” Now it is she who looks faint. I put a hand under her elbow.

“Are you all right?”

She nods. “Yes. Yes. I’ve been waiting for this. We heard about the list of names being stolen from the Community Centre. But where can we go?”

From Lisa. Copyright © 1987 by Carol Matas.

Jesper / by Carol Matas

Jesper is the sequel to Lisa. Readers of Lisa find out that, while fighting in the Danish resistance movement during World War II, Lisa met and fell in love with another young resistance fighter named Jesper. This novel provides an exciting account of Jesper’s activities fighting the Nazis after Lisa has escaped to Sweden.

For Jesper, it is a time when nothing is safe, and no one can be trusted. There are German soldiers everywhere; worse yet, there are Danes who secretly spy on their neighbors in exchange for extra food or money. Despite the terrible danger, though, teenage Jesper risks everything to work for the resistance.

The Second World War is at its height. Like most of Europe, the small nation of Denmark has been overrun by Hitler’s armies. Food and supplies are rationed, newspapers are censored, and Danes who resist are jailed, tortured, even shot. But Jesper and his friends in the resistance defy the Germans–and put their lives on the line–by publishing an underground newspaper to tell people what is really happening in the war, and carrying out desperate feats of military sabotage–with the Germans constantly at their heels.

Jesper was just a boy when the Nazis occupied Denmark but he has grown up quickly. He has seen friends die. He has seen others betrayed. He has learned to fire a rifle, commit an act of sabotage, and kill an enemy soldier. Now known only by his code name, Kris, Jesper has become a dangerous fighter for freedom. If he is caught, he will be tortured and killed. He is afraid of dying, but he will never give up.

Jesper is a novel of determination, courage, and love. It is also a tale of twisted loyalties, ruthlessness and betrayal, and the darker side of heroism.

Excerpt:

As we drove on through the city, I suppose my strongest emotion was sadness — the kind of deep regret you feel when saying goodbye to those you love; not only the people you love but the places, too. Copenhagen was my home. The city was full of memories. It was dark, I couldn’t see much, but I could tell approximately where we were going. We drove away from downtown and the shops, and the outdoor restaurant where my parents used to take me on sunny Saturday afternoons, where we’d listen to jazz and they’d drink beer; away from downtown and the streets where my friends and I used to walk up and down hoping to bump into girls we liked; into the residential areas of the northern part of the city, past the huge parks, the statues, the houses with their copper roofs turned green with age, the apartment buildings built in the late twenties. I could smell the ocean; the wind was damp, as always, with sea water.

We arrived at Ryvangen and the truck shuddered to a halt. I thought of my family, of Lisa, of Stefan. I hoped they all knew how much I cared for them.

“Heraus! Schnell, schnell!” Were those the last words I was to hear before I died? The soldiers used their rifle butts to shove us out of the truck into a central courtyard with barracks all around and lights shining down from above. We were called by name or by number — I suppose those prisoners who wouldn’t even reveal their code names had been given numbers. When we’d been identified we were marched off in two groups of four, again pushed ahead by rifle butts. We were marched past a barracks house, then down a cobblestone path into a boulevard of trees. At this point our two groups split away from each other.

My group was herded off the main path onto a narrow one surrounded by trees. We were pushed deeper and deeper into the woods until we reached a small clearing, open on the side of the path but with banks of earth built up on the other sides. Four wooden poles were stuck in the ground in front of the far rise. One by one we were lashed to these poles. They didn’t bother to uncuff my hands; they just tied me to the pole by winding the rope around my chest and my legs. Then five soldiers lined up in front of us, machine guns ready. I remember thinking what a beautiful night it was. The trees rose up all around us, but when I looked straight up I could see stars. The branches made a beautiful sound as they rustled and swayed in the wind. I couldn’t help but think what a peaceful spot this was.

One of the soldiers started to call out: “Ready, aim.” I took a deep breath, said a prayer to God to protect those I loved, shut my eyes, held my breath, felt my heart hammering against my chest. No wonder they tied you up. My knees buckled, and I would have dropped to the ground.

“Fire.”

From Jesper. Text copyright © 1989 by Carol Matas.

In My Enemy’s House / by Carol Matas

In Carol Matas’ explanation of why she wrote In My Enemy’s House she says:

“While researching another book on the Holocaust, I came across stories of Jewish families who lived in Germany during the war and somehow managed to hide using false papers or moving from place to place. I immediately realized how amazing those stories were and wanted to write about that time and place. I especially wanted to write about what it was like to live in Nazi Germany. What did ordinary German people think, what did they believe? Did they agree with the Nazi ideas? And if they did, why did they?

All of the people I interviewed [while researching this book] had had to hide their identities in order to survive. If discovered they certainly would have been murdered, and each of them told stories of others they knew who had trusted a German friend, boyfriend, or girlfriend with their secret and had been betrayed and handed over to the authorities. I was able through their stories to explore what was happening right in the heart of Nazi Germany. And to ask some very difficult questions about what we are capable of as human beings, for good and for evil.”

This is the fictional story of Marisa—a blond haired blue eyed Jew.  In fact she looks more Polish than Jewish, and she speaks Polish with no accent at all.  This has really helped her family ever since the Germans invaded Poland.  This also means she can take off the dreaded armband, with the yellow Star of David on it, to go get food or do other forbidden things.

As the Nazi “actions” (which are mass roundups of Jews) become more regular, it gets harder and harder to hide from the German soldiers.  Marisa’s mother and younger siblings have been rounded up in the latest action.  Luckily she and her sister Fanny were in the country hiding, so the Nazis didn’t find them.  But, now what can they do?

Fanny is dark and looks very Jewish, so she cannot be seen.  Finally, Marisa is forced to make the difficult decision to leave those she loves behind in order to save herself.  She takes a Polish girl’s work papers and heads off to Germany.  She will be working in the heart of enemy territory surrounded by Nazis.  How will she keep her secret?  If they find out she is a Jew it will be all over.

She finds work with the Reymann family, a wealthy farming family who treats Marisa with dignity and respect. Marisa’s life with the Reymanns may seem safe—they appear fair—but she can never forget that Herr Reymann is a high-ranking Nazi official and his daughter Charlotte attends the League of German Maidens. Marisa is hiding in plain sight in her enemy’s house.

How could these people be so kind and yet murder and condone murder and torture with no problem?

She watches the children play the board game Jews Out, and she helps them with their lessons that teach them that Jews are not even of the human race. The brutal details of the genocide are always there (the children have photos of German soldiers with their guns aimed at naked men, women, and children), and Marisa sees how you can become numb to the suffering of those who are dehumanized.

This story holds you not only with the authentic account of the Jewish girl in hiding in disguise right in the jaws of the enemy but also with the intimate view of the Nazi home.

Excerpt:

When the medical inspection was over and we were dressed, all the girls were taken into a large room. We were forced to stand there as one by one we were interrogated. It was almost my turn when the young girl being questioned ahead of me started to cry.

“I’m not a Jew…”

“Look at you!”

She had black hair, brown eyes, and a delicate face. “I can’t help that I’m dark. Papa is dark, his family is like that. Look at my papers.” Hands trembling, she showed them her papers.

“You could have stolen them from someone! How do we know they’re real?” He took them. “Quickly, what is your mother’s name?”

“Zosioa.”

“Your father’s”

“Mlot.”

“Where were you born?”

“Kielce.”

They kept peppering her with questions, and even though she had tears running down her face she answered them all correctly.

The man thrust the papers back at her. “All right. I suppose you just have the bad luck to look like one of them.”

I felt like saying, “Look at Hitler. Dark hair, dark mustache, he doesn’t look like his Aryan ideal.” But of course I said nothing.

When it was my turn I smiled prettily and handed over my papers.

He looked at me approvingly, then at my papers. “Excellent.” he said, and moved on.

Finally we were put back on the train. We traveled another day and night and in the middle of the third day we arrived at our destination, a city called Weimar. And so, we were there, in the heart of the darkness, in the country that had spawned all that hatred, all that evil. I was beyond terror, though.

What could be worse than what I’d already seen?

From In My Enemy’s House. Copyright © 1999 by Carol Matas.

Turned Away / by Carol Matas

During the Second World War, many French Jewish families tried to send their children to safety in other countries including Canada. Tragically, the Canadian government didn’t want them and a number of children who were “cleared” to leave never made it and were sent to concentration camps where they died. This is a story of one family’s struggle.

Here we read about Devorah Bernstein, a young Winnipegger whose 1941 diary has been created by author Carol Matas, also a Winnipegger.

Part of the “Dear Canada” series, Matas writes about events and attitudes of people during World War II—not only about how Jews were being rounded up and murdered in Europe, but also about how they were the target of anti-Semitism in Canada as well.

Caught up in the maelstrom of the times, Devorah confides everything in her journal, recording every event – including “If Day”, when local people posed as Nazis and staged a mock invasion to illustrate what it would be like if the city was occupied.

Devorah is a girl from a family that has just moved literally from “the other side of the tracks” as her dentist-father, the first Jewish dentist in Winnipeg, begins to prosper.

As she records issues that arise in her daily life, Devorah worries about the fate of her French cousin, Sarah, who had visited Winnipeg only a few years earlier. Letters from Sarah tell of Jews being thrown out of school, denied the right to hold a job, arrests, persecutions and transports to death.

Excerpt:

January 9,

A letter arrived from Sarah, again tucked in with mail from Uncle Nathaniel.

Chère Devorah,

Our worst fears came to pass. Three huge bangs on the door. Maman ran to my room and told me to keep the door closed and not to come out. Within minutes she came back and sank down on my bed weeping. “They’re taken him,” she said. “To Drancy. Arrested.”

I can barely sleep anymore. I keep hearing that pounding on the door. Sometimes I feel the sound will explode in my brain. Chère Devorah, what is wrong with the world? I don’t understand any of this. Do you?

Your loving cousin, Sarah

The letter from Uncle Nathaniel told of being arrested, but little else, except another question about how the visas are going. I could hear Mommy crying from her bedroom.

Matas does not spare young readers the details of what happened to these people, many of whom could have been saved by other countries. The grim truth is that the Canadian government refused to take in French children who had visas to come to here, and they perished at Hitler’s hands.

The position of the Canadian government, headed by Mackenzie King, was tacit consent, since they knew the dangers people faced and chose not to save them. Canada took in only 5000 people Jews between 1933-1945, compared to 200,000 by the Americans. Even South American countries took in more people than Canada.

Anti-Semitism existed in Canada as an unofficial policy and practice. Jews were restricted from medicine, dentistry, law and other professions. They were excluded from neighborhoods, resorts and clubs. Daily, Jews were often the target of insults and attacks which escalated with the rise of fascism in Europe.

Matas has Devorah get involved in many activities to support the war effort. The war brought people great risks, but also great excitement and change after the soul-destroying Depression. Devorah is excited by all the initiatives, but worried over her two brothers and a cousin who have enlisted.

One brother and cousin are captured by the Japanese in Hong Kong, a happening which causes great consternation in her family. Matas includes newspaper headlines about the plight of the men in Japanese prisoner of war camps. Many died from barbarous treatment, overwork, starvation and disease. This is an important chapter of Canadian history that is brought to life, which has particular relevance to Winnipeg, since the Japanese captured an entire regiment of soldiers from this region–
The Winnipeg Grenadiers.

Devorah’s writing and thoughts are expressed authentically. Readers will absorb a lot about the life of children, their leisure-time activities, how life went in Winnipeg and in general during World War II. The book also reflects the changing attitudes of the Jewish community as it became part of the mainstream.

Whirlwind / by Carol Matas

This book is all about fear.

It is 1941. Fourteen-year-old Ben Friedman flees the horrors of Nazi Germany with his parents and his sister, leaving behind his grandparents, his friends, his home.

In Seattle, Ben dares to hope that he will finally be safe. He finds a friend in John, a Japanese-American boy, but then comes the attack on Pearl Harbor and everything changes. John and his family are forced to leave their home and move to a squalid camp just because they are Japanese.

When his only friend at school, a child of Japanese immigrants tells him that his family is being forced to leave their home and move to a squalid camp just because they are Japanese, Ben feels it all beginning again. Where can he be safe? What should he do? Ben wonders if anyone, anywhere, is safe from discrimination. After all, Ben is now “an American,” albeit an American Jew of German descent, so he should be safe. Right?

Rage wells up inside him and he tries to convince his parents to flee. Canada seems like a good plan to him so when no one listens to him and the front window of his house is smashed, he runs away.

Excerpt:

“I ran into my room, shut the door and curled up on my bed. I was shaking and couldn’t stop.  Everything was repeating itself! It couldn’t be happening. We were supposed to be safe here. It wasn’t fair! Why couldn’t we be safe anywhere? Why?…

It was only the next morning when I awoke to that awful sound – someone pounding on our door. They were here. I knew it. I had tried to tell Father. But he wouldn’t listen. And now it would be too late. They’d take us all away…”

Ben runs away to Canada but to his horror, the US and Canada seem to offer less protection that he had imagined.

On a historical note—and as we also heard in the book Turned Away—the immigration systems in both the United States and Canada put limits or quotas on refugees during the war years. Actually, Canada’s policy was to let in as few Jews as possible, declaring, “None is too many.”

In the story, Ben feels he has nowhere to turn, nowhere to run. Perhaps safety is not where or even what he thinks it is. Perhaps life is not what he imagined at all. Events swirl around him, and he feels out of control, caught in the whirlwind that was the 1940s.

Daniel’s Story / by Carol Matas

How many of you have cameras?  What kinds of things do you take pictures of?  Happy things you want to remember, right?  Daniel’s uncle has given him a camera for his birthday.  Daniel records all the happy moments like parties and family, pictures of his father’s store and of school.  Then things begin to change for Daniel and his family.  They are Jews living in Germany as Adolf Hitler rises to power.

Daniel barely remembers leading a normal life before the Nazis came to power in 1933. He can still picture once being happy and safe, but memories of those days are fading as he and his family face the dangers threatening Jews in Hitler’s Germany in the late 1930’s.

No longer able to practice their religion, vote, own property, or even work, Daniel’s family is forced from their home in Frankfurt and sent on a long and dangerous journey, first to the Lodz ghetto in Poland, and then to Auschwitz – the Nazi death camp. Only his mother’s shrewd insistency that they wear their warmest clothes and winter boots allows some of them to survive and through cunning and luck, Daniel and his father survive the specter of the ovens, to be sent to Buchenwald where the slave labor camps operate.

Though many around him lose hope in the face of such terror, Daniel, supported by his courageous family, struggles for survival. He finds hope, life and even love in the midst of despair.

At one point in the story, Daniel asks his girlfriend Rosa how they can possibly have the strength to carry on. Rosa’s firm reply: “We will do it for all those who couldn’t … We will dedicate our lives to making sure this can never, ever happen again.”

While Daniel is a fictitious character, his story was inspired by the actual experiences of many of the more than one million children who died in the Holocaust.

Greater Than Angels / by Carol Matas

In the autumn of 1940, when Anna Hirsch, her friends, and her family are rounded up by Nazis and deported to Gurs, a refugee camp in the south of France, they see little hope on the horizon. Food is scarce, and the living conditions inhuman. Even worse is the ever-present fear that they will be relocated once again – this time to one of the death camps.

But when word comes that Anna and the other children at Gurs are to be moved, their destination is not Auschwitz or Buchenwald, but Le Chambon-sur-Lignon: a tiny village whose citizens have agreed to care for deported Jewish children. As the war rages on and the Germans gain more control in France, Jews – and those who shelter them – are sought with increased vigor, and when they are found, the punishment is severe. Yet even in the face of Nazi atrocities, and regardless of the risk to themselves, the good people of LeChambon continue to protect the refugees who seek cover in their homes.

“Everyone in this whole area is working to save us, even knowing what could happen to them if they are caught.”

Based on actual occurrences during the German occupation of France, Carol Matas unveils a contagious goodness that permeated one corner of a region otherwise enveloped in evil, and celebrates the courage that made these citizens “greater than angels.”

Excerpt:

IT IS SO CRAMPED, curled up against the wall, hidden by the woodpile. I would give anything to be able to stretch my legs.

Klara whispers in my ear. “I feel like we’ve been in here for hours. How much longer, do you think?”

I whisper back. “I don’t know. I don’t hear anything anymore, and it must be three or four o’clock by now. Still, I know Madame Debard will let us out as soon as it’s safe, so it must not be safe.”

“What are you guys talking about?” Klara asks.

“Gurs. What about you?”

“Me too. I was thinking about your concerts.”

“I hear something!” I hiss. “Quiet!”

Twigs snap, I can hear the crunch of boots on the ground. As long as they don’t torture me, I think. Just let them shoot me. I don’t think I could stand up to torture for more than a minute. Then I’d tell them anything. Anything.

From Greater Than Angels. Copyright © 1998 by Carol Matas.

Good Night, Maman / by Norma Fox Mazer

Karin Levi is one of the lucky Jews to escape France alive, with her brother Marc. To be a Jew in France, during Hitler’s occupation, was basically a death sentence. Follow the complex path of Karin and Marc as they move, under cover of darkness from place to place, searching for safety. Eventually the siblings reach Italy and are able to secure passage on the Henry Gibbons, a ship sent to Naples to bring refugees to America. Along the way, Karin composes letters to her Maman, who is supposed to catch up to them when she is better.

Excerpt:

We had stayed on the ship overnight. When we left, they gave us tags to pin on our clothes. U.S. ARMY CASUAL BAGGAGE.

“As if we’re packages,” I said, when Marc translated.

“It’s because we’re not official. I guess they don’t know what to call us.”

“How about visitors? Aren’t we guests of President Roosevelt? We’re not here to stay.”

In America, Karin is taken to Fort Ontario in Oswego, New York. At first she wonders what kind of place she has come to, and wonders why she must live in a place with high fences and barbed wire. Gradually, she develops friendships and starts school, but always Karin writes her mother and wonders when she will come.

The facts at the back of the book explain that more than 84,000 French people were sent to concentration camps and over 6 millions Jews were killed in Europe. The American government only brought 982 people as refugees, all of which were housed at Lake Oswego. It’s rather sobering to see how pitifully small that number is when over one hundred thousand German prisoners of war were kept on American shores during the war.

My Canary Yellow Star / by Eva Wiseman

Excerpt:

“Thank you, sir! Thank you! You gave us life!” In my joy, I kissed his hand.

“No, no,”‘ he cried. “You thank Wallenberg, not me! I work here. Wallenberg, he bring Schutz-Pass here!”

Goldberg patted my hand. He pointed to the star on my blouse. “Take off. Not need…… Schutz-Pass.”‘ He walked over to one of the kitchen cabinets and took out a large pair of scissors. “‘Take off,”‘ he said again.

I carried the scissors into the bathroom, took off my blouse, and unpicked the stitches. Then I cut the canary yellow material into tiny pieces and flushed them down the toilet. I gazed at myself in the mirror above the sink. The star was gone and the old Marta had reappeared. I felt light, as if I could fly.

Fifteen-year old Marta Weisz watches her beloved grandmother brutally killed by teenaged Arrow Cross soldiers. She activates her internal protective mechanism that switches life into a fantasy movie, but, in an instant, she is transported back to the horrific moment. Bending down, pretending to tie her shoelaces, and risking her life as she does so, Marta secretly lifts her grandmother’s Star of David necklace off the ground, and slips it into her shoe. The sharp points that prick her will embolden her on her journey to stay alive.

Eva Wiseman’s My Canary Yellow Star depicts Budapest and its Jewish population devastated by Nazi occupation (March 19, 1944 to April 4, 1945). Guiding some of the more fortunate Jews of Hungary, including Marta and her family, and steadily propelling the plot, is the presence of a most humble and heroic individual, Raoul Wallenberg, a non-Jewish Swedish diplomat who risks his life to rescue thousands of Jews during the six months he spent in Hungary during the Holocaust. My Canary Yellow Star is a novel, and Marta is a fictional character, though Raoul Wallenberg is a very real individual. Through his enigmatic diplomatic efforts which involved housing Jews and arranging for thousands to receive protective passports (“Schutz-Passes”), Raoul Wallenberg was responsible for rescuing as many as 100 000 Jews.

Despite Wallenberg’s efforts, however, Marta and her family must still fight to stay alive. The first signs of ludicrousness surface when Marta is sent home early from school one day. Mr. Kohn, principal of Marta’s school, beseeches his students: “Always remember March 19, 1944 (……) This is the beginning of very cruel times for the Jews of Hungary.” Soon after, Marta’s father, a surgeon renown for his elegance and generosity, is deported to a labour camp. Then, the Jews of Budapest must scramble to find “Yellow Star” housing, housing designated for Jews. Marta, determined to put herself to use for the greater good of her family, finds work with a compassionate gentile seamstress who is committed to help Marta’s family in any way that she can.

In her new work, Marta becomes the scapegoat for the petty crimes, wrongfully accused of theft by Arrow Cross (the prominent Hungarian Fascist party which closely aligned itself with the Nazis) girls who protest sharing their supplies with a “stinking dirty Jew.” Wiseman skilfully paints portraits of the individuals- Hungarian neighbours and ‘friends’- who betray humanity without hesitation, reporting Jews with whom they had lived side-by-side for years before.

I am David / by Anne Holm

This is a story about a young boy’s epic journey across Europe, and his budding emotions and sense of the wonder of life.

The facts are simple. David is a 12 year old boy. He has lived all his life in a concentration camp somewhere in Eastern Europe. He does not know anything about his parents or where he comes from, or why he is in the camp. All he knows is that he is David. One day, without any explanation, a guard arranges for him to escape. The electric current is switched off from the perimeter fence for half a minute, just long enough for David to climb over. He is given bread and water and a compass. He is told to head south for Salonica, stow away on a ship sailing to Italy, and then walk north until he comes to a country called Denmark. And that is what David does.

Now, what kind of person would you be if you had spent all your life in a concentration camp? The first thing you may notice about David is his extraordinary isolation. He has survived in the camp by never allowing himself to think further than the next meal. After the death of his friend and teacher, Johannes, he never permits himself to have any affection for anyone. Out of the camp and on the run he believes, not unreasonably, that ‘they’ are after him. Of all the people that he meets on his long journey, he doesn’t feel able to trust anyone. And so he shoulders the burden of the journey alone.

But as David journeys across Europe he begins to comprehend that he cannot live life entirely alone. He does need other people, Maria, whom he saves from the fire, and the dog, and perhaps a mother of his own … And it works the other way round – other people may need things from him. It is not good enough for David simply to hate evil when he finds it in others. If others say they are sorry for their evil acts then he must also learn to forgive, because relentless unforgiving is another kind of cruelty.

The book is not set in a real time or place. Although the circumstances seem real enough, David’s background is a synthesis of all the terrible persecution that happened during the Second World War and the subsequent years of cold war communism. This helps to make David a very powerful and pure figure. I don’t think he is particularly real. Anne Holm uses him as a blank canvas on which can be drawn the first experiences of life – beauty, knowledge, trust, religion, love, everything.

And what pleasure he discovers in the simple things of life:

Before he had come to the town he had known about nothing but death: here he had learnt to live, to decide things for himself; he had learnt what it felt like to wash in clean water in the sunshine until he was clean himself, and what it felt like to satisfy his hunger with food that tasted good; he had learnt the sound of laughter that was free from cruelty; he had learnt the meaning of beauty –

Twenty and Ten / by Claire Huchet Bishop

Penned [just after World War II] by a Frenchwoman from Le Havre whose grandfather was the village storyteller, Twenty and Ten is based on a true story. And, I must say . . . it certainly has the tension of a real-life Nazi story. This story takes place at a refuge in France. At the time, Germany had taken over France and were destroying the Jews. In order to save the lives of ten Jewish children, Sister Gabriel and her twenty students put their own lives at stake. When the Jewish children came, the twenty students promised that they would never betray the children, “no matter what the Nazis do.”

Excerpt:

While we were still waving we saw Suzanne slip off Philip’s back and run toward us at top speed. She tumbled into the midst of us, shaking from head to foot. “They’re coming! They’re coming!” she yelled. And suddenly Philip and George were also among us, panting. “They’re coming! They’re coming! The Nazis are coming!”

“What?” we shrieked, and we all raced up the slope and looked, the smaller ones taking turns on Philip’s back.

Far, far down on the valley road two green spots with helmets moved toward us on bicycles.

We looked at one another, terrified. Then I don’t know how but Henry, Arthur, Denise, and I, we all said at once, “The cave!” And we ran toward the back of the house. The others followed us.

–from p. 44 of Twenty and Ten

Sources

Daniel’s Story:

Falk, Carrie and Joy Stortvedt. “Teen Book Talks.” Shenandoah Public Library. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://www.shenandoah.lib.ia.us/teenbooktalks.html&gt;.

White, Valerie, “Emergency Librarian”, Mar/Apr 94, Vol. 21, Issue 4

In my enemy’s house:

Falk, Carrie and Joy Stortvedt. “Teen Book Talks.” Shenandoah Public Library. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://www.shenandoah.lib.ia.us/teenbooktalks.html&gt;.

“Scholastic Canada – In My Enemy’s House.” Scholastic Canada | Home. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://www.scholastic.ca/titles/inmyenemyshouse/&gt;.

Jesper:

“Scholastic Canada – Jesper.” Scholastic Canada | Home. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://www.scholastic.ca/titles/jesper/&gt;.

Lisa:

“Scholastic Canada – Lisa.” Scholastic Canada | Home. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://www.scholastic.ca/titles/lisa/&gt;.

“Canadian Book Challenge 2 – Lisa.” My Book and Bead Challenges. 14 Aug. 2008. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://jlwbbchallenge.blogspot.com/2008/08/canadian-book-challenge-2-lisa.html&gt;.

Turned away:

Newman, Michael. “February 19, 1942: If Day.” Manitoba Historical Society. Manitoba History, Spring 1987. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/mb_history/13/ifday.shtml&gt;.

Zaidman, Harriet. “Turned Away: The World War II Diary of Devorah Bernstein.” University of Manitoba. CM Magazine, 30 Sept. 2005. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://www.umanitoba.ca/outreach/cm/vol12/no3/turnedaway.html&gt;.

“Scholastic Canada | Dear Canada – Books.” Scholastic Canada | Home. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://www.scholastic.ca/dearcanada/books/turnedaway.htm&gt;.

The Whirlwind:

 “The Whirlwind by Carol Matas « Bookscoops.” Bookscoops. 19 Feb. 2009. Web. 23 Nov. 2010. <http://bookscoops.com/2009/02/19/the-whirlwind-by-carol-matas/&gt;.

Good Night, Maman:

“Good Night, Maman by Norma Fox Mazer « Bookscoops.” Bookscoops. Web. 30 Jan. 2012. <http://bookscoops.com/2009/04/18/good-night-maman-by-norma-fox-mazer/&gt;.

My Canary Yellow Star:

David, Danya. “CM Magazine: My Canary Yellow Star.” University of Manitoba. Web. 30 Jan. 2012. <http://umanitoba.ca/cm/vol16/no12/mycanaryyellowstar.html&gt;.

I Am David:

“I Am David by Anne Holm: Book Review.” Reading Matters: Children’s Book Reviews, Teenage Book Reviews. Web. 30 Jan. 2012. <http://www.readingmatters.co.uk/book.php?id=85&gt;.

Twenty and Ten:

“Lesson Plan – WORLD WAR II.” TeacherLINK @ Utah State University. Web. 30 Jan. 2012. <http://teacherlink.ed.usu.edu/tlresources/units/byrnes-literature/kirby.html&gt;.

“Twenty and Ten Unit Study.” Classical Childrens Books. Web. 30 Jan. 2012. <http://www.classical-childrens-books.com/twenty-and-ten-unit-study.html&gt;.

“Twenty and Ten by Claire Huchet Bishop.” Bookfoolery and Babble. Web. 30 Jan. 2012. <http://bookfoolery.blogspot.com/2011/01/twenty-and-ten-by-claire-huchet-bishop.html&gt;.


The Nose from Jupiter / Richard Scrimger

Booktalk:

Have you ever wished for help? Maybe you are in a situation and can’t see a way out of it, and you just look to the sky and think, “Someone, please help me!” Well, that is just what Alan did when dealing with the Cougars, a tough gang at school who was out to get him. Did help come? Yes, but not in the way he expected. Alan thought a bee was buzzing around him when suddenly something completely unexpected flew right up his nose! (Read page 27 from, “I started to sneeze . . .” to the last sentence on page 29). An alien living inside his nose? You call this help? Norbert, the alien from Jupiter does. Read The Nose from Jupiter by Richard Scrimger to find out how Norbert helps Alan deal with his problems.

Summary

“Alan isn’t brave or strong, and he’s not much good at soccer. What’s more, he seems to be a bully magnet. Everything changes one day when a tiny alien from Jupiter takes up residence in Alan’s nose. Alan’s new condition baffles medical science, but it gives him a whole new, and hilarious, way to solve his problems.

(Source: http://www.multcolib.org/talk/guides-nosefromjupiter.html )

Newton and the Giant / Michael McGowan

Booktalk:

Newton is tired of being the butt of his family’s jokes, tormented by his athletic (and evil) older quadruplet brothers, and unappreciated by everyone he meets. When he accidentally scores on his own team’s net, he knows his siblings will stop at nothing to get revenge. He escapes to his attic refuge, hoping his brilliant scientific brain can outsmart them…and finds himself suddenly face to face with a large, smelly, and sock-obsessed giant named Herbert.

Before long Newton and Herbert join forces in an odd alliance that involves a magical world, a quest for survival, a few mysterious events, some boogers, and yes, even a flying machine. Can they accomplish all they’ve set out to do before the bad guys win? Even more importantly, will Newton be able to make it back to his own world — and teach his brothers not to mess with him — before time runs out?

Excerpt: (pg. 8)

The quadruplets were twelve, two years older than Newton. As far as Newton was concerned, they might as well have been aliens the way they communicated with each other in a secret language. Because they were so good at sports, they never got in trouble for blowing up toys, torturing animals or pushing grandmothers into snowbanks. Adults seemed blind to the obvious fact that they were the meanest kids in the neighborhood. Especially Newton’s parents. Whenever they got bored, which happened frequently because they had extremely short attention spans, the quadruplets would devise ways to bug their younger brother. Once they stole all his Christmas presents and replaced them with packages of mud. Another time they hung him by the ankles from the jungle gym, trying to make him say “uncle” –until he barfed. To make matters worse, his parents believed everything that the quadruplets told them.

What’s a science geek to do?

(Sources: http://www.gecdsb.on.ca/staff/teachers/just%20read/newton.htm )

The Million Dollar Strike / Dan Gutman

Booktalk:

Fans of Goosebumps will enjoy reading about what happens to Ouchie and Squishy in The Million-Dollar Strike—even though the only thing that may die in this humorous story is the bowling alley!

Ouchie and Squishy LOVE bowling, even if it isn’t the coolest sport. And their favorite place to bowl is Bowl-A-Rama. So, when the Parkfield city council decides to condemn the decrepit alley, Ouchie and Squishy are devastated. Then the boys meet Gazebo Zamboni, the rich, reclusive, totally nutty owner of Bowl-A-Rama, and convince Mr. Z. to keep Bowl-A-Rama open. He allows the boys to restore the old alley, and even sponsors a million dollar strike contest to bring in customers. Just when things start looking up, the most nightmarish scenarios of Squishys overactive imagination come to life. . . .


Excerpt: (pg 6 & 9)

“Hey Ouch,” Squishy said, “wouldn’t it be cool if right now some lunatic who escaped from an insane asylum burst in here with a machete and started chasing us around?”

“Shut up, Squish, or I’ll make you sniff my bowling shoes.”

I wasn’t scared. I knew he was just trying to distract me, but I couldn’t help but sweep my eyes across the twenty lanes to see if there were any suspicious-looking lunatics lurking around. …

…I was bent over, tying my sneakers, when I sensed a shadow had crept over me. I looked up.

[Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!] I screamed.

It was the most horrifying thing I had ever seen in my life.

(Source: Books in Print)

Shredderman: Secret Identity / Wendelin Van Draanen

Excerpt: (pg. 1)

Bubba Bixby was born big and mean, full of teeth and ready to bite.

That’s what my mom thinks anyway.

My dad says a boy isn’t born bad—he grows into being bad.

I don’t know who’s right. What I do know is that Bubba Bixby’s got rocky knuckles.

And killer breath.

Teachers are always telling him to use words instead of fists—they have no idea what they’re saying! Bubba-breath can knock you out cold.

Ask Ian McCoy. It actually happened to him in the third grade. When Bubba shouted at him, Ian’s eyes rolled up in his head.

His knees buckled.

Then he blacked out and bit the dirt.

We had to slap his cheeks like crazy to get him to wake up, and when he did, he sat up, then threw up.

Booktalk:

Fifth grader Nolan, dubbed “Nerd” by the school bully Bubba Bixby, decides to put Bubba in his place with the birth of Shredderman.com.  Nolan becomes a sleuth detective as he secretly photographs Bubba’s cruel and destructive antics with his digital camera.  Nolan downloads the crime in action onto his website. Bubba’s tormenting ways are exposed for all to see. As Nolan grows more daring, so does his fear of being discovered by Bubba. What will happen next? Will his secret identity be revealed?

(Source: http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/vandraanen_secret.htm )

Forward Shakespeare! / Jean Little

Booktalk:

In this sequel to Rescue Pup, Shakespeare completes his training to become a Seeing Eye guide dog. Shakespeare is an extraordinarily intelligent and sensitive guide dog, with a special power that enables him not only to understand human speech but also to communicate with other dogs telepathically.

Shakespeare is teamed with Tim, a young man who has recently lost his sight and is extremely angry, sad, and fearful. As Tim learns to trust Shakespeare, he discovers the joy and freedom that having a guide dog enables him to experience. But Shakespeare faces challenges, too.

Excerpt: (pg. 2)

Shakespeare could understand Human, the language used by people, as well as Dog, the telepathic speech with which canines communicated with each other. When he had been a small puppy, he had imagined that all dogs understood human speech, but he had soon learned that he was gifted with special powers. His extra ability had made him feel lonely at first, but by this time he was not only used to it but thankful for it. After all, it let him tell Larking that they were going to school to learn to guide the blind. Even so, he was not sure what “blind” meant.

What are “the blind”? Larking asked humbly, certain that his clever friend would have the answer ready.

Shakespeare gave him a baffled look.

They talk about “the blind” a lot, he said. But nobody ever stops to explain what the words mean. We’ll find out soon enough, I guess.

Larkin stared at him.

I thought you understood all their words, he said.

Not quite. But whatever “blind” means, it’s not something bad; it’s something important, Shakespeare told him. Tessa promised it would be an adventure.

Summary :

Seeing-eye pup, Shakespeare, conquered many fears in Rescue Pup. Now he is back, about to be matched up with a blind boy, ready to begin his working life. Tim is enraged by his blindness and wants nothing to do with a guide dog. But he is no match for Shakespeare.

(Source : Canadian Book Review Annual)

human rights

human rights (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee)

The following is a list of a few nonfiction titles in the Edmund Partridge Community School Library related to the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights:

INTERNET
323    The public service announcements

    [S.l.] : TXL Films, c2006-2010.

    Title from home page (viewed on January 20, 2010)
All videos are downloadable. http://www.youthforhumanrights.org/what-are-human-rights/videos/born-free-and-equal.html

    30 and 60 second Public Service Announcements (PSAs) that depict the 30 articles of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

323
WAT    Watson, Susan

        Understanding human rights /

        Collingwood, ON : Saunders Book Company, 2008, c2003.

        Includes glossary and index.

    Explores the basic needs of human beings, why they are not met in some parts of the world, how war and politics impact human rights, and what can be done to help meet people’s basic needs, both through such groups as the United Nations and the efforts of individual citizens.

323.6
CAN    Canadian citizenship /

    Calgary : Weigl, 2005.

    Examines the rights and responsibilities attached to being a Canadian citizen.

323.4
BAU    Baughan, Brian.

    Human rights in Africa /

    Philadelphia : Mason Crest Publishers, c2007.

    Includes glossary.

    This book discusses the history behind the as-yet-unfinished struggle to secure fundamental rights and freedoms for all Africans and explains the roles of organizations, such as the United Nations and the African Union, to advance the cause of human rights for Africans.

323.171
HUD    Hudak, Heather C.,

    Rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizens /

    Calgary : Weigl, c2011.

    Provides a detailed look at the country’s systems of government. Learn how decisions at the municipal, provincial, territorial, and federal levels of government take shape. An in-depth review of Canadian democracy.

362.7
SMI    Smith, Roger,

    UNICEF and other human rights efforts : protecting individuals /

    Philadelphia, Pa. : Mason Crest Publishers, c2007.

    Examines the efforts of the United Nations to preserve basic human rights for all individuals including the right to political freedom and the right not to suffer torture or cruel punishment.

323
HAR    Harris, Joseph,

    What are human rights? /

    Mankato, MN : Arcturus Publishing, 2010.

    Examines the history of human rights, the challenges of agreeing to a universally acceptable code, the desire for universal rights versus governments’ freedom to control their own affairs, and the rights of an individual versus those of a group or nation.

PR
323.07
REA    Reardon, Betty.

    Educating for human dignity : learning about rights and responsibilities /

    Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c1995.

    “A K-12 teaching resource”–Cover.

PR
323.07
HUM    Human rights education for the twenty-first century /

    Philadelphia, Pa. : University of Pennsylvania Press, c1997.

323
EVE    Every human has rights : a photographic declaration for kids /

    Washington, D.C. : National Geographic, 2009.

    “Based on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.”.
“With poetry from the ePals community.”.
Includes index.

    Based on the thirty rights listed in the “United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” explores the basic freedoms of human beings, especially children, with examples of how these rights have been implemented around the world.

361.7
LEW    Lewis, Barbara A.,

    The teen guide to global action : how to connect with others (near & far) to create social change /

    Minneapolis, MN : Free Spirit Pub., c2008.

    Includes real-life stories, hands-on activities, and up-to-date resources that inspire kids to make significant social changes in the world around them such as fighting hunger and poverty, promoting health and human rights, and saving the environment.

If you liked…..then try…..


A Series of Unfortunate Events series / by Lemony Snicket

http://www.unfortunateevents.com/

The House with a Clock in its Walls / by John Bellairs

The Secret Garden / by Frances Burnett

Artemis Fowl / by Eoin Colfer

James and the Giant Peach / by Roald Dahl

Matilda / by Roald Dahl

The Thief Lord / by Cornelia Funk

The Graveyard Book / by Neil Gaiman

What-the-Dickens: the Story of a Rogue Tooth Fairy / by Gregory Maguire

The Case of the Missing Marquess: an Enola Holmes Mystery / by Nancy Springer

 


Diary of a Wimpy Kid series / by Jeff Kinney

http://www.wimpykid.com/

Frindle / by Andrew Clements

Darth Paper Strikes Back: an Origami Yoda book / by Tom Angleberger

How to Survive Middle School / by Donna Gephart

The Homework Machine / by Dan Gutman

Tales from a Not-So-Fabulous Life / by Rachel Renée Russell

Middle School is Worse than Meatloaf: a Year Told Through Stuff / by Jennifer L. Holm

The Popularity Papers: Research for the Social Improvement and General Betterment of Lydia Goldblatt & Julie Graham-Chang / by Amy Ignatow

Big Nate in a Class by Himself / by Lincoln Peirce

Sideways Stories from Wayside School / by Louis Sachar

Schooled / by Gordon Korman

 

 


Check our library catalogue from the EP homepage under “Programs & Services”

This list predominantly consists of MYRCA (Manitoba Young Readers’ Choice Award) nominees and winners (past and present) that have an emphasis on teen issues. There are a few other award winners such as the Canadian Library Association Book of the Year Award thrown into the mix to round out the list. Also note that these are all Canadian titles.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA)

In 1990, the Manitoba School Library Association decided to mark the International Year of Literacy by developing a literacy initiative that would have a positive and lasting impact on a vulnerable segment of the reading population, children in grades 4 through 8. (Grade 4 has since been eliminated in order to make the selection more suitable for the entire age range.)
The Manitoba Young Readers’ Choice Award was born.

Group 1: “Dealing with Pain” (Death, Grief, Disabilities and Illness)

Group 2: Family Relationships

Group 3: Bullies and Fitting In

Group 4: “No Place to Go” (Adoption, Orphans, Homeless, Foster Homes)

Group 5: Survival

Group 1: Dealing with Pain

After / Hazel Hutchins.

Montréal : Smith, Bonappétit & Son, c2008.

198 p.

Teenagers — Death — Fiction. Grief — Fiction. Guilt — Fiction. Courage — Fiction. Canadian authors. Canadian fiction. Tragedies — Fiction.
Choice (Psychology) — Fiction.

When a random shooting plunges the families of both victim and perpetrator into intense grief, two young teens from very different backgrounds struggle to rebuild their lives.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2010 nominated title.

A perfect gentle knight / Kit Pearson.

Toronto : Puffin Canada, 2007.

205 p.

Mothers — Death — Fiction. Siblings — Fiction. Grief — Fiction. Tragedies — Fiction. Vancouver (B.C.) — Fiction. Bereavement — Psychological aspects — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors.

Tells the story of the five Bell children, each of them coping in various ways in the aftermath of their mother’s death. Set in the 1950s and seen through the perspective of the middle child, 11-year-old Corrie, Pearson’s story illustrates how a rich fantasy life both helps and hinders children trying to cope with loss, loneliness, and growing up.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2009 nominated title.

Alone at ninety foot / Katherine Holubitsky.

Victoria : Orca, c1999.

169 p.

Suicide — Fiction. Mothers — Death — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors. Father-daughter relationship — Fiction. Tragedies — Fiction.

Pamela Collins, 14, lives with her father and she spends a lot of time alone at Lynn Canyon Park. Little by little, readers learn why. Last year, following the death of her baby sister, her mother jumped from a bridge in the canyon.

CLA (Canadian Library Association) Young Adult Book Award 2000 winner.

Mama’s going to buy you a mockingbird / Jean Little.

Toronto : Puffin Canada, 2005, c1984.

vi, 245 p.

Cancer — Fiction. Family life — Fiction. Fathers — Death — Fiction. Grief — Fiction.

Young Jeremy and Sarah learn to cope with their grief and drastically changed lifestyle during their father’s battle with cancer, which forces their mother to sell their house and return to school full time.

RL: 6.2.

Canadian Library Association (CLA) Book of the Year for Children Award 1985 winner.

Rebound / Eric Walters.

Toronto ; New York : Stoddart Kids ; Niagara Falls, N.Y. : Distributed in the U.S. by General Distribution Services, c2000.

262 p.

Quadriplegics — Fiction. People with disabilities — Fiction. Friendship — Fiction. Basketball — Fiction. Canadian authors. Canadian fiction.

Sean, who is trying to keep out of trouble and make the basketball team, must accompany David, who uses a wheelchair after a spinal cord injury but who is still the better player, to class and the boys come to realize they have more in common than they thought.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2002 nominated title.

The giant-slayer / Iain Lawrence.

New York : Delacorte Press, 2009.

292 p.

Poliomyelitis — Fiction. Storytelling — Fiction. Imagination — Fiction. People with disabilities — Fiction. Fairy tales — Adaptations. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors.

When her eight-year-old neighbor is stricken with polio in 1955, eleven-year-old Laurie discovers that there is power in her imagination as she weaves a story during her visits with him and other patients confined to iron lung machines.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2011 nominated title.

Angels turn their backs / Margaret Buffie.

Toronto : Kids Can Press, c1998.

239 p.

Canadian fiction. Divorce — Fiction. Panic attacks — Fiction. Agoraphobia — Fiction. Canadian authors — Manitoba.

Addy Jarrick, a smart, talented and funny fifteen-year-old, has her world turned upside down when her parents split up and she moves with her mother away from Toronto, causing her to have panic attacks and hear voices.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2001 honor book winner.
Red Maple Award nominee.
McNally Robinson Book for Young People Award nominee.

Group 2: Family Relationships

Odd man out / by Sarah Ellis.

Toronto : Groundwood Books, 2006.

162 p.

Canadian fiction. Canadian authors. Mental illness — Fiction.

While staying with his grandmother and five female cousins for the summer, twelve-year-old Kip finds a journal written by his deceased father and is shattered when he learns that his father suffered from paranoia and delusions.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2007 nominated title.

Who is Frances Rain? / by Margaret Buffie.

Toronto : Kids Can Press, c1987.

192 p.

Ghost stories. Family life — Fiction. Vacations — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors — Manitoba.

It’s going to be a long, hot summer for 15-year-old Lizzie. Normally a vacation at her grandmother’s cottage is the highlight of the year. But not this summer, especially not when her mother and new stepfather decide to come along. But when Lizzie decides to explore Rain Island to get away from all the family bickering, the excitement begins. What will the ruins of a cabin and a pair of child’s spectacles tell her about her family’s past? And why has she been chosen to make the discovery?

CLA (Canadian Library Association) Young Adult Book Award 1988 winner.

Bone dance / Martha Brooks.

Vancouver, B.C. : Douglas & McIntyre, c1997.

179 p.

Parent-child relationship — Fiction. Occult fiction Dreams — Fiction. First Nations — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors — Manitoba. Native Peoples — Manitoba — Fiction. Manitoba — Fiction.

When her father wills her a cabin on land in rural Manitoba, Alexandra meets a young man who shares her Native heritage and her experience of being haunted by spirits.

CLA (Canadian Library Association) Young Adult Book Award 1998 winner.

Zack / William Bell.

[s.l.] : Seal Books, 2001.

211 p.

Race relations — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors. Blacks — Fiction. Slaves — Fiction.

The son of a Jewish father and black mother, high school senior Zack has never been allowed to meet his mother’s family, but after doing a research project on a former slave, he travels from his home in Canada to Natchez, Mississippi to find his grandfather.

Mr. Christie’s Book Award.

Return to Bone Tree Hill / Kristin Butcher.

Saskatoon : Thistledown Press, c2009.

142 p.

Mystery fiction. Canadian authors. Canadian fiction. Homicide — Fiction. Missing children — Fiction. Memory — Fiction. Victoria (B.C.) — Fiction.

Disturbed by recurring dreams and her conscience, Jessica travels to her childhood town near Victoria to find out the truth about the alleged murder of a friend when she was twelve years old.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2011 nominated title.

Uncle Ronald / Brian Doyle.

Vancouver : Douglas & McIntyre, c1996.

138 p.

Uncles — Fiction. Aunts — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Child abuse — Fiction. Canadian authors. Canada — History — 19th century — Fiction.

In 1895, to escape his violent father, Mickey is sent to stay with his Uncle Ronald and his twin aunts in the hills north of Ottawa and learns to feel safe for the first time in his life.

Red Cedar Award Nominee 1998-1999.
CLA (Canadian Library Association) Book fo the Year for Children Award 1997 winner.

Johnny Kellock died today / Hadley Dyer.

Toronto : HarperTrophyCanada, 2006.

151 p.

Mother-daughter relationship — Fiction. Missing children — Fiction. Family life — Fiction. Canadian authors. Canadian fiction. Halifax (N.S.) — Fiction.

Rosalie Norman is having a boring summer in Halifax 1959. But when her cousin Johnny Kellock goes missing she enlists the help of her neighbour David (aka The Gravedigger) to help find him.

CLA Book fo the Year Award for Children 2007.

Dear George Clooney, please marry my mom / Susin Nielsen.

Toronto : Tundra Books, c2010.

229 p.

Divorce — Fiction. Stepfamilies — Fiction. Single-parent families — Fiction. Interpersonal relations — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors.
Mother-daughter relationship — Fiction.

When Violet’s television-director father leaves Vancouver to live in L.A. with his new wife, and her mother’s relationships seem to be going from bad to worse, Violet decides to help her mother get the perfect man–George Clooney.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2012 nominated title.

Soames on the range / Nancy Belgue.

Toronto : HarperTrophyCanada, c2006.

203 p.

Uncles — Fiction. Teenagers — Fiction. Family life — Fiction. Canadian authors. Ranch life — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Rocky Mountains, Canadian (B.C. and Alta.) — Fiction.

Soames, a young kid from a dysfunctional family and recently suspended from school, moves in with his uncle who lives on a Rocky Mountain ranch.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2009 nominated title.

No small thing / Natale Ghent.

Toronto, ON : HarperTrophyCanada, 2004, c2003.

232 p.

Canadian fiction. Siblings — Fiction. Ponies — Fiction. Horses — Fiction. Single-parent families — Fiction. Poverty — Fiction. Canadian authors. Ontario — History — 20th century — Fiction.

In Ontario, Canada, in 1977, twelve-year-old Nat and his sisters find that owning, training, and caring for a pony they acquired for free makes it easier to cope with the poverty they have faced since their father abandoned them.

Hackmatack Children’s Choice Book Award winner

The refuge / Monica Hughes.

Toronto : Stoddart, 1992, c1989.

140 p.

Mother-daughter relationship — Fiction. Friendship — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors. Single-parent families — Fiction.

Twelve-year-old Barb Coutts is watching her life fall apart; her father has walked out, leaving Barb and her mother to cope on their own. Barb and her mother move to an apartment in a poorer neighborhood. The new home is all the way across town, and Barb friends are left behind. Life looks pretty bleak until one day Barb stumbles upon a hidden paradise–her refuge. She also finds a friend to share it with. But on the day Barb needs her refuge the most, she discovers that it does not belong to her alone.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) nominee 1992.

Group 3: Bullies and Fitting In

Rex Zero, the great pretender / Tim Wynne-Jones.

Toronto : Groundwood Books, c2009.

224 p.

Rex Zero

Moving — Fiction. School stories. Bullies — Fiction. Canadian authors. Canadian fiction. Family life — Canada — Fiction. Ottawa (Ont.) — Fiction.

Sequel to: Rex Zero, king of nothing.

Just as Rex Zero is looking forward to starting grade seven with his band of close friends, he learns that his family is moving again. In desperation, he concocts an elaborate strategy that will allow him to stay in his old school district. In addition to this, Rex must deal with the school bully.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2011 nominated title.

The present tense of Prinny Murphy / Jill MacLean.

Markham, Ont. ; Brighton, Mass. : Fitzhenry & Whiteside, 2010.

230 p.

Friendship — Fiction. Bullies — Fiction. Alcoholism — Fiction. School stories. Poetry — Fiction. Bullies — Fiction. Books and reading — Fiction. Reading disability — Fiction. Canadian authors. Canadian fiction.

Sequel to: The nine lives of Travis Keating.

Prinny Murphy is dealing with an alcoholic mother, losing a best friend, bullies, and a reading problem, but when a substitute teacher introduces her to a special book she realizes life is full of possibilities and poetry.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2012 nominated title.

The black sunshine of Goody Pryne / Sarah Withrow.

Toronto : Douglas & McIntyre, c2003.

177 p.

Bullies — Fiction. Canadian authors. Canadian fiction. Emotionally disturbed children — Fiction. Friendship — Fiction. Grief — Fiction Parents — Death — Fiction. Interpersonal relations — Fiction.

Unable to get over the death of his father two-year before, reclusive Stevie Walters finds his life at a standstill until he is befriended by big, abrasive, loud-mouthed Goody Pryne whose overwhelming personality and bullying manner energize him in unexpected ways.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2005 nominated title.

Word nerd / Susin Nielsen.

Toronto : Tundra Books, c2008.

248 p.

Friendship — Fiction. Conformity — Fiction. Mother-son relationship — Fiction. Single-parent families — Fiction. Scrabble (Game) — Fiction. Allergy — Fiction. Canadian authors. Canadian fiction.

When some bullies at his new school almost kill him by slipping a peanut into his sandwich, friendless nerd Ambrose, forced to be home-schooled by his overprotective mother, coerces his neighbor Cosmo into taking him to the West Side Scrabble Club, where people accept him for who he is.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2010 winner.

Schooled / Gordon Korman.

Toronto : Scholastic Canada, c2007.

208 p.

Individuality — Fiction. Grandmothers — Fiction. Home schooling — Fiction. Middle schools — Fiction. Canadian fiction. School stories. Canadian authors.

Homeschooled by his hippie grandmother, Capricorn (Cap) Anderson has never watched television, tasted a pizza, or even heard of a wedgie. But when his grandmother lands in the hospital, Cap is forced to move in with a guidance counselor and attend the local middle school.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2009 nominated title.

Cairo Kelly and the Mann / Kristin Butcher.

Victoria, BC : Orca Book Publishers, 2002.

172 p.

Baseball — Fiction. Literacy — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors.

When Kelly and Midge decide to help their favorite umpire, Hal Mann, remain an umpire, they discover the truth behind Hal’s refusal to take the exam.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) book, 2004.

Group 4: “No Place to Go”

Awake and dreaming / Kit Pearson.

New York : Puffin Books, 1999.

228 p.

Mother-daughter relationship — Fiction. Dreams — Fiction. Adoption — Fiction.

While living a miserable, poverty-stricken life with her young, irresponsible mother, nine-year-old Theo dreams of belonging to a real family but finds a shadowy figure haunting her thoughts.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 1999 winner.

Home free / Sharon Jennings.

Toronto : Second Story Press, c2009.

152 p.

Orphans — Fiction. Summer — Fiction. Authorship — Fiction. Friendship — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors.

“A Gutsy girl book”.

What Leanna Mets wants to be most is a writer. When Cassandra Jovanovich, an orphan, moves in across the street, she sees her chance. Orphans are so romantic, and makes much good stories, don’t they? But during this fateful summer Leanna finds out that being an orphan may not be as exciting as it appears.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2011 nominated title.

Hold fast / Kevin Major.

Toronto : Stoddart, c1978.

170 p.

Canadian fiction. Orphans — Fiction. Parents — Death — Fiction. Traffic accidents — Fiction. Canadian authors. Tragedies — Fiction. Newfoundland and Labrador — Fiction.

After his parents are killed in a traffic accident, Michael and his younger brother are split up. Michael must now live with relatives in a city far from his home.

Canadian Library Association (CLA) Book of the Year for Children Award 1979 winner

Willow and Twig / Jean Little.

Toronto : Puffin, 2001.

227 p.

Canadian fiction. Canadian authors. Emotionally disturbed children — Fiction. Homeless persons — Fiction. Vancouver (B.C.) — Fiction.

Ten-year-old Willow and her younger, emotionally disturbed brother, Twig, feel like “nobody’s children.” Abandoned by their drug-addicted mother, Angel, they become homeless when their temporary caretaker suddenly dies.

Mr. Christie’s Book Award 2000 winner.
Canadian Library Association (CLA) Book of the Year for Children Award 2000 shortlist title.

Bank job / James Heneghan, Norma Charles.

Victoria, BC : Orca Book Publishers, c2009.

165 p.

Bank robberies — Fiction Foster home care — Fiction. Canadian authors. Canadian fiction.

Library copy signed by the author.

Thirteen-year-old Nell and her friends rob banks to raise money for renovations at their foster home.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2011 nominated title.

Everything on a waffle / Polly Horvath [also available in audio]

Toronto : Douglas & McIntyre, 2001.

179 p.

Canadian fiction. Self-reliance — Fiction. Uncles — Fiction. Foster home care — Fiction. Interpersonal relations — Fiction. Canadian authors. British Columbia — Fiction.

Eleven-year-old Primrose living in a small fishing village in British Columbia recounts her experiences and all that she learns about human nature and the unpredictability of life in the months after her parents are lost at sea.

Newbery Honor Book 2002.
Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA), 2003.

Mr. Christie’s Book Award 2001 winner.

Easy Avenue / Brian Doyle.

Toronto : Douglas & McIntyre, 1988.

122 p.

Friendship — Fiction. High school students — Fiction. Money — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Humorous fiction. Canadian authors. Ottawa (Ont.) — Fiction.

Hubbo O’Driscoll learns an important lesson about the moral dilemmas money can bring.

RL: 5.1.

CLA Book of the Year for Children Award 1989 winner.

Group 5: Survival

Dog lost / Ingrid Lee.

New York : Chicken House, 2008.

197 p. :

Pit bull terriers — Fiction. Dogs — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors.

After living happily in a warm home with an eleven-year-old boy, a pit bull terrier loses his owner and is forced to survive on the streets, where its brave deeds surprise many residents who dislike or fear pit bulls.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2010 honour book.

Chocolate River rescue / Jennifer McGrath Kent.

Halifax, NS : Nimbus Publishing, c2007.

108 p.

Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc. — Fiction. Canadian fiction. Adventure fiction. Canadian authors.

“A heart-pounding adventure inspired by true events.” –Cover.

Ten year olds Shawn Mahoney and Tony Steeves, and Shawn’s younger brother, Craig, eight, are trapped on an ice floe and speeding down New Brunswick’s Chocolate River.

Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2009 nominated title.
We all fall down / by Eric Walters.

[Toronto] : Seal Books, 2007, c2006.

195 p.

September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001 — Fiction. Father-son relationship — Fiction. Courage — Fiction. Contemporary fiction. Canadian fiction. Canadian authors.

Sequel: United we stand.

Today is September 10, 2001. As an assignment, all the students in Will’s class will be going to their parents’ workplaces tomorrow.

Red Maple Award 2007 nominated title.
Winner Red Maple Award 2007 fiction.
Manitoba Young Readers Choice Award (MYRCA) 2008 winner.

Below is a small selection of fiction titles about social issues that teens are interested in.

Good-bye Marianne: the graphic novel / by Irene N. Watts ; illustrated by Kathryn E. Shoemaker

Marianne Kohn, a Jewish girl living in Berlin in 1938, watches as the Nazi regime tears her family and community apart, until finally she is forced to leave her mother and her home and travel to safety in England.

Booktalk: http://www.readingmatters.co.uk/book.php?id=170

Other titles in the EPCS collection related to the Holocaust can be found at: http://goo.gl/9tY1Y

Secrets in the Fire / by Henning Mankell

A young African girl, Sofia, copes in the aftermath of a landmine explosion that takes both her legs and the life of her sister.

Review: http://www.cool-reads.co.uk/review.asp?ID=236

Other titles in the EPCS collection related to Land Mines can be found at: http://goo.gl/2ZY7U

I am a Taxi / by Deborah Ellis

After his parents are wrongly accused of selling drugs, Diego finds himself living in a women’s prison with his mother where he runs errands to earn a little money to help his family.

Audio Booktalk (mp3 format): http://teachernet.rbe.sk.ca/files/IAmATaxi.mp3

Other titles in the EPCS collection related to Drug Trafficking can be found at: http://goo.gl/s8TcQ

Shattered / by Eric Walters

When Ian must complete community volunteer service at a soup kitchen for the homeless, he is rescued from a near-mugging by a homeless man named Sarge, who was a soldier in the Canadian Armed Forces and served as a peacekeeper in Rwanda. Sarge tells Ian about the Rwandan genocide and Ian tries to help this shattered man who must live with his nightmarish memories.

Booktalk: http://www.gecdsb.on.ca/staff/teachers/just%20read/shattered.htm

Other titles in the EPCS collection related to Homelessness can be found at: http://goo.gl/M1Dek

Touching Spirit Bear / by Ben Mikaelsen

After his anger erupts into violence, Cole, in order to avoid going to prison, agrees to participate in a sentencing alternative based on the Native American Circle Justice, and he is sent to a remote Alaskan Island where an encounter with a huge Spirit Bear changes his life.

Booktalk: http://nancykeane.com/booktalks/mikaelsen_touching.htm

Other titles in the EPCS collection related to Juvenile Delinquency can be found at: http://goo.gl/Vzn1t

The Blue Helmet / by William Bell

Lee’s father sends him to live with his aunt in New Toronto after Lee tries to rob a store during a gang initiation.

Book Review: http://www.umanitoba.ca/outreach/cm/vol13/no3/thebluehelmetfinal.html

Other titles in the EPCS collection related to Gangs can be found at: http://goo.gl/43qpy

The Losers’ Club / by John Lekich

Alex, a secret rebel who has a knack for understanding people, becomes a hero to a group of so-called losers in his local high school.

Publisher’s Description: http://site.annickpress.com/catalog/catalog.aspx?Title=Losers%E2%80%99+Club

Other titles in the EPCS collection related to Bullies can be found at: http://goo.gl/fZ10r

Each Little Bird that Sings / by Deborah Wiles

Comfort Snowberger is well acquainted with death since her family runs the funeral parlor in their small southern town, but even so the ten-year-old is unprepared for the series of heart-wrenching events that begins on the first day of Easter vacation with the sudden death of her beloved great-uncle Edisto.

Discussion Guide: http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plan/each-little-bird-sings-discussion-guide

Other titles in the EPCS collection related to Grieving can be found at: http://goo.gl/uNnn5